Villa Bellucci - Installation Manual

Usage Guide

Customization

Introduction

Villa Bellucci is a powerful travel & tourism theme for WordPress, with an emphasis on providing reservation and room showcase features for hotels or other accommodation providers, as well as gallery pages and slideshows that are perfect for museums or art galleries to promote their exhibitions.

In this guide we'll be looking at how each section of this theme's frontpage is built, as well as the extra pages, features and plugins, along with some basic customization information to help you get started adding your own touch to the theme.

TidyCustoms Optimization and Customization Website Service

Guide Structure

The Villa Bellucci customization guide is split into three sections:

  1. Theme Options - Covers the customization options built into the theme and accessible via the WordPress Customizer.
  2. Frontpage Elements - Examines the core frontpage elements and how they're created, and how you can modify their content for your own purposes.
  3. Theme Features - Explores the extras included with Villa Bellucci, such as plugins, typography, Scroll Reveal and other useful features.

Theme Options

To provide a comfortable customization experience the core settings for Villa Bellucci are included in the WordPress Customizer, where you can see a real-time preview of every option as you change it, making basic customization extremely simple and intuitive, even for beginners. You can reach the customizer screen by clicking on Appearance → Customize in the WordPress dashboard. The customizer is made up multiple option areas, each of which can be expanded by clicking on the section-name. In this section, we'll look at each section's options, and cover what they do.

Site Identity

This section is dedicated to setting the core naming and branding of the theme, covering the site's name, logo etc...Once this section is expanded the following options are available:

  • Site Title - The site title is created when you first install WordPress; it sets what name visitors will see in the browser tab when browsing your site and will be used as the logo content when the Logo Type option is set to Text.
  • Tagline - The tagline appears next the title in the browser's tab, to the right of the divider symbol (|).
  • Site Icon - This options lets you set a favicon for your site, which is displayed in browser tabs & shortcuts or as app icons on mobile phones.
  • Show Tagline - When the Logo Type option is set to Text, the tagline will be displayed underneath the logo of the site.
  • Logo Type - Selects the type of logo that will be displayed at the top of the site; the example logo is created via CSS which you can of course modify, or you can define a simple text or image logo, or have no logo at all.
  • Select Image - This option appears if you have set the Logo Type to Image, allowing you to upload a new logo to use on your site.

Colors

This section lets you customize the core color scheme of Villa Belluci using a helpful color picker rather than modifying the CSS directly. There is only one option in this section:

  • Primary Color - The majority of the Villa Belluci layout is based on images, but this setting controls the color of additional elements such as buttons, links, and highlights.

Menus

This tab contains options for creating and setting menus, with the same functionality as the menu page. There are two main options in this section:

  • Menu Locations - This option lets you assign available menus to the available locations in the theme.
  • Add a Menu - Lets you create new menus and assign items to them.

Any menus you have created will also appear in this section where you can modify there available links and options.

Widgets

This section allows you to add, remove or edit widgets in the widget positions available in the Villa Belluci theme, similar to the functionality you would find in the Appearance → Widgets section of the dashboard, but with the benefit of the preview window to see the effects of the widget as they are created (with some exceptions; some third-party widget's can be updated in this section, but won't live preview due to the way that they work behind the scenes).

Static Front Page

This section deals with how your frontpage content is laid out, with options for displaying static pages or latest posts. The available options are:

  • Front page displays - Choose whether you want your frontpage to display a list of your latest posts, or a styled static page. Villa Belluci uses a static front page to create its homepage content, so it's advisable to leave this setting as A Static Page.
  • Front Page - Sets the static front page; in Villa Belluci if you've used the quickstart or manual install guide then you should already have a page with the Frontpage template set as your frontpage, and this should not be changed as it is relied upon to create the frontpage layout.
  • Posts Page - Sets a separate page where you will display your posts if you are using a static frontpage. This option should not be needed, as a blog section is already included with Villa Belluci which will display your latest posts.

Font Options

Villa Belluci has support for multiple fonts, from standard web fonts to more complex offerings from Google Fonts, and you can target each individual element of the page to use a particular font, though the standard installation already has all relevant elements targeted if you're not interested in getting that deep into customizing the fonts! The available options are:

  • Define Size of the Fonts - This option sets the base size of the font, from which all other text sizes are taken. Essentially, the base size is the size standard text will use, with CSS-styled text being larger or smaller relative to this base size.

  • Body Font - Sets the font used in the Body elements of the theme (such as blog post text etc...). This can be a standard web font such as Verdana or Arial, or a Google Font.

  • Google Font URL for the Body - This option only appears when the Body Font option is set to Google Font. Here, you can add the URL for the Google Font you wish to use (more information is available in the Using a Google Font section of this guide that follows this one).
  • Selectors for the Body font - This field contains all the CSS classes or elements that should be changed to the selected Body Font. These elements are already preset in the theme, but you may add/remove your own elements if desired.

  • Header Font - Sets the font used in the Header elements of the theme (e.g. headings, logos etc...); choose from standard web font or Google Font.

  • Google Font URL for the Header - Appears if the Header Font option is set to Google Font. The Google Font's URL can be added here.
  • Selectors for the Header font - Defines the CSS elements that should use the selected Header Font. Can be customized if desired.

  • Other Elements Font - Defines the font used in the Other Elements of the theme (such as the author info section, comments etc...); choose from standard web font or Google Font.

  • Google Font URL for the other elements - Appears if the Other Elements Font option is set to Google Font. The URL for the chosen Google Font should be added here.
  • Selectors for the Other Elements font - Defines the CSS classes that should use the Other Elements font. Users may add/remove their own classes as needed.

In each of the Font options there is a choice between using a standard web font or a Google Font; follow these steps to apply a new font to each section as needed:

Using a Google Font

Setting up a Google Font in the theme requires some very simple steps:

  1. Navigate to to Google Fonts website.
  2. From the list of fonts, select the one you wish to use and click the Quick Use icon.

    choosing a font from the google fonts website

  3. Select the styles and character sets you wish to use for the font by clicking the tickboxes next to each.

    choosing styles for the selected google font

  4. In the Add this code to your website section, copy only the font URL from the link element.

    copying the google font url for use in wordpress

  5. In the Appearance>Customize>Font options section of your WordPress backend, select Google Font in the drop-down list for the section you wish to use.

  6. Paste the copied URL into the Google Font URL for Header/Body/Other Elements field; after a moment the live preview will update to show you how your site looks with the new font.

  7. Click the Save & Publish button to save changes.

The font has now been set as needed, and you will see the changes in the live preview window.

Using a Standard Font

The standard fonts available may be seen and selected in the Header Font, Body Font or Other Elements Font drop-down list; under the initial Google Font option are a list of standard fonts, so if you wish to use one of these fonts you may simply select it from the list, and the live preview will updated accordingly.

Layout

This section is concerned with the width of the theme, specifically in regards to the sidebar and the responsive width on each screen size, such as for tablets and mobile phones (which dictates which media elements are loaded etc...). The available options are as follows:

  • Theme Width - Sets the max width (in pixels) of the theme; this is the largest that it will stretch to given a screen with a high-enough resolution; the default is 1240px.
  • Tablet Width - Sets the max width for the tablet layout; screens larger than this set width will use the desktop site-layout. The default setting for this options is 1040px.
  • Small Tablet Width - Sets the max width for the small tablet layout. Default setting is 840px.
  • Mobile Width - Sets the max width for the mobile layout; default is 640px.
  • Sidebar Width - Sets the total width of the sidebar; the width is set as a percentage of the total available width to ensure that the sidebar remains uniform across all screen sizes. For example, if your theme width is set at 1000px and the sidebar widget is set at 30%, then the sidebar will be 300px wide. You can experiment with this setting by going to a page that uses the sidebar such as the room preview pages; the live preview will update the sidebar as you change the options.
  • Sidebar Position - Sets whether the sidebar should appear on the left or right of the theme on the pages that have a sidebar.

Features

This section covers any special features that do not fit into the other categories, as well as toggles for included JavaScript libraries. The available options are:

  • Enable Classic Menu - When enabled, the main menu of the theme will appear at the top of the screen in the usual position. When this option is disabled, the classic menu is replaced with menu button and icon that opens an Aside menu when clicked.
  • Enable Fixed Classic Menu - When both this option and the Enable Classic Menu option are enabled, the main menu is accessible at any point on the page when the user scrolls up. If this option is disabled or if the aside menu is selected then the user must scroll to the top of the page to access the menu.
  • Display Details on Pages - When enabled pages will display the author, creation date and other pertinent information, similarly to what is displayed on the blog posts.
  • Enable Word-break - This option may be useful when using elements with a dynamic width or a non-romanized language such as Japanese or Korean that may not word-wrap correctly otherwise.
  • Use Scroll-Reveal - When enabled, animations created using the Scroll Reveal library, which produces reveal animations for HTML elements, will be displayed. More information on Scroll Reveal may be found in the Theme Features section of this guide.
  • Use Photo Swipe - Sets whether to use the Photo Swipe functionality, which adds touch functionality to the gallery page layout included in this theme.
  • Display Related Posts - When enabled, a related-posts section is added at the bottom of each post, with images and links to other posts.
  • Read More Button on Categories - This option toggles whether a "More" text link should appear on post category listing pages under each listed post.
  • Use Page Preloader - When the page preloader is enabled, each page load is accompanied with a animated loading screen so users only see the page once the major elements have been loaded.
  • Enable Popup Login - When disabled, clicking on a login link will take the user to a separate login page. When this option is enabled, clicking the login link will open a login overlay without navigating away from the current page.
  • Date Format - Defines the formatting for the dates in post previews and at the top of posts.
  • Copyright Text - Here you can add HTML that will be displayed in the footer of the theme.

Note: As in Villa Belluci the footer elements are created via a **Text** widget in the **Bottom V** position HTML added to this field will be used only when this widget is disabled or non-existent.

Social API

The Social API area provides options related to the addition of share buttons and social network icons in the theme.

  • Post Social Icons - Toggles whether post pages will include Facebook, Twitter, Google+ etc...Like & Share buttons at the bottom of each post page.
  • Page Social Icons - Provides the same functionality as the above option, but this time toggles whether the icons appear on pages rather than posts.
  • Enable Popup for Social Icons - When enabled, the social icon links are all contained in a separate button, that provides a list of social networks to share to.

    sharing posts via the social media button

    If disabled, the icons will all appear separately at the bottom of the post's page.

    Note: If this option is disabled only the buttons for Facebook, Google+ and Twitter will be available.

  • Enable FB Icon - Set whether a Facebook share button is included in the list of sites to share to.
  • Enable Twitter Icon - Toggles whether a Twitter share button is added to the social icons area.
  • Enable Google Icon - Adds a Google+ share button to the social area.
  • Enable Pinterest Icon (Only available when Icon Popup is enabled) - Adds a Pinterest link to the list of available social networks for sharing.
  • Enable LinkIn Icon (Only available when Icon Popup is enabled) - Adds a LinkedIn link to the list of available social networks for sharing.
  • Enable VK Icon (Only available when Icon Popup is enabled - Adds a VK link to the list of available social networks for sharing.

Cookie Law

This Customizer panel is dedicated to configuring a cookie banner in accordance with EU law.

  • Use Cookie Consent Plugin - Enables or Disables the Cookie Law plugin.
  • Consent Mode - Defines the type of cookie consent your site uses; choose from Explicit, where no cookies are set until the visitor consents, and Implied, which sets cookies but offers users the option to opt-out.
  • Use SSL - Sets whether the Cookie Banner uses Secure Socket Layer (SSL) to protect any data it receives.
  • Banner Placement - Choose where the Cookie Banner appears on your site.
  • Tag Placement - Selects where the Privacy Settings tag appears on your page, that opens the Cookie Consent overlay when clicked.
  • Refresh after gaining consent - Toggles whether the page should refresh after cookie consent is given.

There are some advanced configuration options available with this plugin; more information may be found on our blog in this features article.

Header Slider

Options in this section control the look and extra elements of the slideshow.

  • Image Height - Sets the max height for the slideshow image.
  • Image Width - Sets the max width for the slideshow image.
  • Tablet Image Height - Sets the max height for the slideshow as it appears on tablet-sized screens.
  • Tablet Image Width - Sets the max width for the slideshow on tablet-sized screens.
  • Mobile Image Height - Sets the slideshow max height for mobile screens.
  • Mobile Image Width - Sets the slideshow max width for mobile screens.
  • Show Title Block - Toggles whether the frontpage slideshow should display each slide's title & subtitle as a text overlay.
  • Show Prev/Next Buttons - When enabled pagination arrows to switch between slides on the left and right of the slide area.
  • Show Pagination - When enabled additional pagination buttons are added to the bottom of the slideshow so users can instantly click to any slide.
  • Enable Autoanimation of Slider - Toggles whether the slideshow rotates through slides automatically or not.
  • Slider Animation Interval - Sets the length of time between the autoanimation moving between slides in milliseconds.
  • Image Background Color - Sets the color of the background behind the image; this is displayed when no featured image is set in the slide or if the images fail to load.

Slider

The options in this section provide similar functionality to the Header Slider section, but this time focused on the bottom slider. The available options are:

  • Image Height - Sets the max height for the slideshow image.
  • Image Width - Sets the max width for the slideshow image.
  • Tablet Image Height - Sets the max height for the slideshow as it appears on tablet-sized screens.
  • Tablet Image Width - Sets the max width for the slideshow on tablet-sized screens.
  • Mobile Image Height - Sets the slideshow max height for mobile screens.
  • Mobile Image Width - Sets the slideshow max width for mobile screens.
  • Show Title Block - Toggles whether the frontpage slideshow should display each slide's title & subtitle as a text overlay.
  • Show Prev/Next Buttons - When enabled pagination arrows to switch between slides on the left and right of the slide area.
  • Show Pagination - When enabled additional pagination buttons are added to the bottom of the slideshow so users can instantly click to any slide.
  • Enable Autoanimation of Slider - Toggles whether the slideshow rotates through slides automatically or not.
  • Slider Animation Interval - Sets the length of time between the autoanimation moving between slides in milliseconds.
  • Image Background Color - Sets the color of the background behind the image; this is displayed when no featured image is set in the slide or if the images fail to load.

Newsletter

This section controls the newsletter popup's options.

  • Newsletter Display - Sets the trigger for the newsletter popup appearing; it can be set to Display Directly, so it appears immediately when the page loads, Display After Time, so it appears after a time delay, and Display After Scrolling, so it appears when the user scrolls.
  • Time Delay (Seconds) - When the Newsletter Display option is set to Display After Time, this option sets the delay between the page loading and the popup appearing.
  • Scroll Delay (px) - When the Newsletter Display option is set to Display After Scrolling, this option sets the number of pixels the user must scroll down the page before the newsletter popup appears.

Contact Page

This section is only available when the Customizer preview viewport is on the contact page i.e. when the frontpage preview loads in the demo layout, clicking on the Contact link in the main menu will take you to the contact page, and this section will appear. This section includes options specific to the contact page.

  • Enable reCaptcha - When enabled users must complete a reCaptcha before they can send an email via the contact form.
  • Email Source - Sets the email address that messages sent via the contact form should be sent to. If left empty the WordPress administrator email address will be used as default.
  • Display Google Map - Toggles whether the Google map view is displayed on the contact page or not.
  • Latitude Value/Longtitude Value - These values set where the Google map will be focused on on the contact page when it loads.
  • Enable User Interface on the Map - When enabled the zoom, streetview and direction controls are visible on the map so users can scroll and zoom.
  • Level of Map Zoom - Sets the zoom level of the map on load.

Frontpage Elements

Villa Bellucci uses a page-based system to create its homepage content. This works by creating a page that has a special template, called Frontpage, assigned to it. Subpages are then added to this base page, with each subpage creating a new section of the homepage. For example, in the demo layout for Villa Bellucci, the base frontpage page contains the reservation form that appears in the header, and the first subpage of the frontpage creates the slideshow (with subpages of the slideshow page creating the slides). Then, the third subpage creates the text and photo block underneath the header.

Of course, it can all sound rather confusing when written out like that, so let's visualize this layout system with a list:

  • Frontpage (header reservation form)
    • First Subpage (header slideshow)
      • First header slideshow slide
      • Second header slideshow slide
    • Second Subpage ("Modern Accommodations" and hotel information text and image grid)
    • Third Subpage ("Your satisfaction is our priority" text section)
    • Fourth Subpage (bottom slideshow)
      • First bottom slideshow slide
      • Second bottom slideshow slide
    • Fifth Subpage (room showcase)
    • Sixth Subpage (Testimonials)
    • Seventh Subpage (Blog highlights)

As you can see, the frontpage is the starting point, with first-level subpages creating each section of the page, and second-level subpages creating slides for the two slideshows. At the start of each frontpage customization section we'll highlight where in this hierarchy we currently are to help you keep track of things.

Each subpage can contain multiple elements, including HTML code to create the text and image blocks, shortcodes for creating the room and blog post highlights, and images that are used as slides or as backgrounds. In each section, we'll cover which of these elements are used, how they work, and finally, how to modify the elements to add your own content.

Much of the HTML tags you will see in these sections will include **data-sr** attributes; these attributes refer directly to the ScrollReveal JavaScript library, which is included in Villa Belluci and makes creating scroll reveal animations easy. More information on how these attributes may be modified is covered in the **Features** section of this guide, but when first making changes these attributes should be left untouched to preserve the aesthetic in the theme.

The Header Reservation Form

The header reservation form appears in the right-hand side of the header, providing an easy way for guests to send booking requests to your hotel.

the header reservation form in the hotel wordpress theme

This section's details are taken from the base frontpage:

  • Frontpage (header reservation form)
    • First Subpage (header slideshow)
    • Second Subpage ("Modern Accommodations" and hotel information text and image grid)
    • Third Subpage ("Your satisfaction is our priority" text section)
    • Fourth Subpage (bottom slideshow)
    • Fifth Subpage (room showcase)
    • Sixth Subpage (Testimonials)
    • Seventh Subpage (Blog highlights)

This section is created using a shortcode in the mainbody of the page that creates an instance of the gkhotelreservation plugin, which displays the reservation form. The shortcode as used in the demo looks like this:


		    [GK_Hotel_Reservation title="Book Now" fields="name,email,phone" rooms_max="5" adult_max="3" children_max="2" subtitle="When would you like to stay villa?"]
		

Shortcode Breakdown

The shortcode is extremely simple; like other shortcodes in WordPress, the Hotel Reservation plugin starts with a basic shortcode:


			    [GK_Hotel_Reservation]
			

This will load the basic version of the reservation form with the default settings, which will match the demo layout. From this base shortcode, additional attributes are added after the shortcode text but before the closing square bracket to modify the core settings. The available attributes are:

  • title - This attribute can be used to set the bold text that appears at the top of the form.
  • subtitle - This attribute defines the smaller subtitle text that appears under the title.
  • rooms_max - Sets the maximum number of rooms that can be selected in the
  • adults_max - Sets the maximum number of adults that can be booked per room.
  • children_max - sets the maximum number of children that can be booked per room.
  • fields - Defines which text fields appear on the booking form that appears when the Make Reservation button is clicked; there are three fields available: name, email, and phone.

As you can see in the demo content, the title is set as "Book Now, the subtitle is set as "When would you like to stay villa?", adult_max and child_max are both set to 2, rooms_max is set to 5 and the fields attribute is set to use all three fields, name,email,phone. These match the default settings so it was not necessary to include all the attributes, but this was done so that vigilant users could figure out how to change the settings if necessary.

Changing the Title

To change the title, modify the text between the quotes in the title attribute of the shortcode:


			    [GK_Hotel_Reservation title="Your Title Here"]
			

Changing the Subtitle

To change the subtitle, modify the text between the quotes of the subtitle attribute:


			   [GK_Hotel_Reservation subtitle="Your Subtitle Here"]
			

Changing the Booking Form Fields

The booking form by default consists of three fields; a name, email and phone number field. However, you can limit the number of fields if necessary; for example, you may only require a name and contact email address. To limit which fields appear, modify the text between the quotes of the fields attribute:


			    [GK_Hotel_Reservation fields="Required Fields Here"]
			

So if we wanted to use only email and name fields, we'd add these two fields separated by commas in the quotes:


			    [GK_Hotel_Reservation fields="name,email"]
			

Changing the Max Bookable Rooms

To limit the number of rooms that can be requested in any single reservation, change the number between the quotes of the rooms_max attribute:


			    [GK_Hotel_Reservation rooms_max="max number of rooms here"]
			

Changing the Max Adults & Children

To change the max number of adults and children that may be booked per room (that is, changing the maximum number selectable in the Adults and Children drop-down list), modify the numbers between the quotation marks of the adults_max and children_max attributes:


			    [GK_Hotel_Reservation adults_max="Max Adults Number Here" children_max="Max Children Number Here"]
			

The Header Slideshow

The header slideshow provides a stylish introduction to your site, as well as a nice background for the reservation form:

the header slideshow of the hotel wordpress theme

This section is created in the First Subpage of the Frontpage:

  • Frontpage (header reservation form)
    • First Subpage (header slideshow)
    • Second Subpage ("Modern Accommodations" and hotel information text and image grid)
    • Third Subpage ("Your satisfaction is our priority" text section)
    • Fourth Subpage (bottom slideshow)
    • Fifth Subpage (room showcase)
    • Sixth Subpage (Testimonials)
    • Seventh Subpage (Blog highlights)

No actual information is contained in this page; the slides are provided via subpages added to this page.

How it Works

Unlike the other frontpage areas which rely on shortcodes or HTML to create their content, the slideshows work in a similar way to the frontpage as a whole. That is, the subpage itself creates the slideshow automatically, and then any subpages added after that count as slides.

Let's visualize this hierarchy:

  • First Subpage (header slideshow)
    • First header slideshow slide
    • Second header slideshow slide

So we have the header slideshow page, which is a subpage of the Frontpage. Then, further subpages are added to the slideshow page, with each subpage creating a slide.

The header slideshow base page contains no information save a title, but this is used just to help backend users distinguish the page from the rest. The actual meat of the slideshow, that is, the slides plus the overlay text and link, are all provided in the individual slide subpages.

So the First Subpage that creates the header is just a placeholder, and its subpages provide the slides. Let's look at how the slide subpage works.

In each slide subpage there are four elements that are defined; a Featured Image, which defines the slide image, a Title, which creates the large overlay text, and an <a> tag in the mainbody of the page that contains the link URL for the slide, and the smaller subtitle text that appears above the title in the slide's text overlay.

The tag is just a standard tag, with no additional classes or other elements:


			    <a href="Slide Link URL Here">Subtitle Text Here</a>
			

So adding more slides is as simple as creating a new subpage of your header slideshow base page, and adding a title, featured image and <a> tag with link and text.

Changing a Slide's Image

Each slide in the header is created via a subpage of the Header Slideshow page, with the Featured Image providing the slide. To change an existing slide's image, in your WordPress backend click on Pages → All Pages to see a list of your pages, and click on one of the subpages of your header slideshow page (this will be the first subpage of your Frontpage).

slideshow subpages in the hotel wordpress theme

Once on the Edit Page screen, you will see the current slide image in the Featured Image section in the right sidebar. To remove the existing slide, click on the Remove Featured Image text under the image.

Once the image is removed, you can specify your new slide image. To do so, click on the Set Featured Image text in the Featured Image section. Your media library will open, and you may upload your slide or select an existing image from your library to use. Once done, click on the Save button at the top of the screen to save changes, and your new slide is ready!

When selecting an image, bear in mind your current image width and height settings (these may be set in the WordPress Customizer). If the image does not match the slideshow's set dimensions it will be cropped & zoomed to fit, which may affect the aesthetics of the slide if there are major discrepancies between the slider's settings and the image ratio.

Changing a Slide's Overlay Text and Link

Each slide has two pieces of overlaid text; a large-font title, and a smaller-font subtitle that appears above the title, and the slide can be set to link to another area of your site when clicked.

To change the title of a slide, open the Edit Page screen for the slide you want to modify, then change the text in the Title field and click the Update button in the top-right to save changes. The new title text will automatically be added in the overlay text.

For the subtitle, you will need to modify the text between the <a> tag in the mainbody of the page.


			    <a href="Slide Link URL Here">Subtitle Text Here</a> 
			

For the slide link, add your own link URL into the href attribute in the opening <a> tag.

Adding a New Slide

Adding new slides to the header slideshow is as simple as adding a new page to your site. First click on Pages → Add New in your WordPress dashboard. Once on the edit screen for your new page, look for the Page Attributes section in the right sidebar. Here, you will see there is a Parent option with a drop-down list of your pages; select your header slideshow base page as your new page's parent; the theme will automatically use this new subpage as a slide.

Now we need to add the slide elements. First, set the slide image by clicking on the Set Featured Image button in the Featured Image section of the right sidebar, and uploading a slide image or selecting one from your Media Library.

Next, add a title to the Title field; this will be used as the large text overlay on the slide. Finally, add an <a> tag containing the slide link URL and subtitle text for the overlay:


			    <a href="Slide Link URL Here">Subtitle Text Here</a> 
			

Now click on the Publish button to make the page public; the slide will be automatically displayed in the header slideshow.

Note: The order of the slides in the slideshow is defined by their date of creation, so if you wish to change the order you will need to delete the older slides and recreate them in a new slide page to move them to the end.

The Hotel Info Section

This section serves as the introduction to your hotel, with two columns of text, an image grid made up of three bottom images and two sidebar images, and a sidebar hotel information section for showing off your rooms, amenities or other hotel features:

the modern accommodations section of the hotel theme

This section is created using HTML taken from the First Subpage of the Frontpage page:

  • Frontpage (header reservation form)
    • First Subpage (header slideshow)
    • Second Subpage ("Modern Accommodations" and hotel information text and image grid)
    • Third Subpage ("Your satisfaction is our priority" text section)
    • Fourth Subpage (bottom slideshow)
    • Fifth Subpage (room showcase)
    • Sixth Subpage (Testimonials)
    • Seventh Subpage (Blog highlights)

In this section, all elements are added via custom HTML, unlike the header section that also uses the WordPress Customizer to control some options. The HTML used in the demo looks like this:


		    <div class="frontpage-content-wrapper">

		    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Modern Accommodations</span></h3>
		    <h2>Stay in luxury and style</h2>

		    <div class="gk-cols" data-cols="2">
		    <div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus. Curabitur at enim at ipsum posuere eleifend. Nullam pharetra diam id mollis scelerisque. Sed erat mauris, sodales nec est a, tincidunt lacinia purus. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.</p></div>
		    <div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus. Curabitur at enim at ipsum posuere eleifend.<cite>"500 World’s Best Hotels 2015"<small>-Trip Magazine</small></cite></p></div>
		    </div>

		    <div class="gk-photo-grid offset-left">
		    <div class="figure gk-grid-1" data-sr="scale up 10%">
		    [caption id="attachment_65" align="alignnone" width="840"]<img src="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel3.jpg" alt="Luxury Rooms" width="840" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-65" /> Luxury Rooms[/caption]
		    </div>

		    <div class="figure gk-grid-2" data-sr="scale up 10% and wait .15s">
		    [caption id="attachment_70" align="alignnone" width="394"]<img src="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel5.jpg" alt="Bathrooms" width="394" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-70" /> Bathrooms[/caption]
		    </div>

		    <div class="figure gk-grid-2" data-sr="scale up 10% and wait .3s">
		    [caption id="attachment_69" align="alignnone" width="394"]<img src="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel4.jpg" alt="Jacuzzi" width="394" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-69" /> Jacuzzi[/caption]
		    </div>
		    </div>

		    </div>
		    <aside id="frontpage-sidebar">
		    <div class="gk-photo-grid no-margin widget">
		    <div class="figure gk-grid-1" style="visibility: visible; ">
		    <img src="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel1.jpg" alt="hotel1" width="400" height="234" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-76" />
		    </div>
		    <div class="figure gk-grid-1" style="visibility: visible; ">
		    <img src="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel2.jpg" alt="hotel2" width="399" height="235" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-77" />
		    </div>
		    </div>

		    <div class="border-title widget">
		    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Hotel information</span></h3>
		    <div class="content">
		    <ul class="gk-info">
		    <li class="gk-info-col-2">
		    <dl>
		    <dt>Check-in:</dt>
		    <dd><strong>2:00 pm</strong></dd>
		    </dl>
		    </li>
		    <li>
		    <dl class="gk-info-col-2">
		    <dt>Check-out:</dt>
		    <dd><strong>12:00 am</strong></dd>
		    </dl>
		    </li>
		    <li>
		    <dl>
		    <dt>Smoking:</dt> 
		    <dd>Non-Smoking</dd>
		    </dl>
		    </li>
		    <li>
		    <dl>
		    <dt>Parking:</dt>
		    <dd>Self parking: €30.00</dd>
		    <dd>Valet: €50.00</dd>
		    </dl>
		    </li>
		    <li>
		    <dl>
		    <dt>Pets:</dt>
		    <dd>Service animals allowed: Yes</dd>
		    <dd>Maximum Weight: 50 lbs</dd>
		    </dl>
		    </li>
		    </ul>
		    </div>
		    </div>
		    </aside>
		

HTML Breakdown

This section contains an awful lot of HTML code, but if we break it down into blocks then things become a lot easier to follow. First off, let's remove the example text from the HTML code and replace it with placeholder text; this will make it a bit clearer which elements go where:


			    <div class="frontpage-content-wrapper">

			    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Title</span></h3>
			    <h2>Subtitle</h2>

			    <div class="gk-cols" data-cols="2">
			    <div class="gk-text-justified"><p>First Column Text</p></div>
			    <div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Second Column Text<cite>"Quotation Text"<small>-Citation</small></cite></p></div>
			    </div>

			    <div class="gk-photo-grid offset-left">
			    <div class="figure gk-grid-1" data-sr="scale up 10%">
			    [caption id="attachment_65" align="alignnone" width="840"]<img src="First Image URL" alt="Alt Title" width="840" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-65" /> Caption Text[/caption]
			    </div>

			    <div class="figure gk-grid-2" data-sr="scale up 10% and wait .15s">
			    [caption id="attachment_70" align="alignnone" width="394"]<img src="Second Image URL" alt="Alt Title" width="394" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-70" /> Caption Text[/caption]
			    </div>

			    <div class="figure gk-grid-2" data-sr="scale up 10% and wait .3s">
			    [caption id="attachment_69" align="alignnone" width="394"]<img src="Third Image URL" alt="Alt Title" width="394" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-69" /> Caption[/caption]
			    </div>
			    </div>

			    </div>
			    <aside id="frontpage-sidebar">
			    <div class="gk-photo-grid no-margin widget">
			    <div class="figure gk-grid-1" style="visibility: visible; ">
			    <img src="First Sidebar Image URL" alt="hotel1" width="400" height="234" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-76" />
			    </div>
			    <div class="figure gk-grid-1" style="visibility: visible; ">
			    <img src="Second Sidebar Image URL" alt="hotel2" width="399" height="235" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-77" />
			    </div>
			    </div>

			    <div class="border-title widget">
			    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Sidebar Text Title</span></h3>
			    <div class="content">
			    <ul class="gk-info">
			    <li class="gk-info-col-2">
			    <dl>
			    <dt>First Large Information Title</dt>
			    <dd><strong>First Large Information Text</strong></dd>
			    </dl>
			    </li>
			    <li>
			    <dl class="gk-info-col-2">
			    <dt>Second Large Information Title</dt>
			    <dd><strong>Second Large Information Text</strong></dd>
			    </dl>
			    </li>
			    <li>
			    <dl>
			    <dt>First Small Title</dt> 
			    <dd>First Small Text</dd>
			    </dl>
			    </li>
			    <li>
			    <dl>
			    <dt>Second Small Title</dt>
			    <dd>Second Small Text</dd>
			    <dd>Second Small Text</dd>
			    </dl>
			    </li>
			    <li>
			    <dl>
			    <dt>Third Small Title</dt>
			    <dd>Third Small Text</dd>
			    <dd>Third Small Text</dd>
			    </dl>
			    </li>
			    </ul>
			    </div>
			    </div>
			    </aside>
			

Now let's establish how the HTML is layered. We may split the entire HTML code into two smaller sections; one for the centre column containing the two columns of text and image grid, whose HTML is contained within the opening <div> element that contains the frontpage-content-wrapper class:


			    <div class="frontpage-content-wrapper">

			    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Title</span></h3>
			    <h2>Subtitle</h2>

			    <div class="gk-cols" data-cols="2">
			    <div class="gk-text-justified"><p>First Column Text</p></div>
			    <div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Second Column Text<cite>"Quotation Text"<small>-Citation</small></cite></p></div>
			    </div>

			    <div class="gk-photo-grid offset-left">
			    <div class="figure gk-grid-1" data-sr="scale up 10%">
			    [caption id="attachment_65" align="alignnone" width="840"]<img src="First Image URL" alt="Alt Title" width="840" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-65" /> Caption Text[/caption]
			    </div>

			    <div class="figure gk-grid-2" data-sr="scale up 10% and wait .15s">
			    [caption id="attachment_70" align="alignnone" width="394"]<img src="Second Image URL" alt="Alt Title" width="394" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-70" /> Caption Text[/caption]
			    </div>

			    <div class="figure gk-grid-2" data-sr="scale up 10% and wait .3s">
			    [caption id="attachment_69" align="alignnone" width="394"]<img src="Third Image URL" alt="Alt Title" width="394" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-69" /> Caption[/caption]
			    </div>
			    </div>
			

And the sidebar, which consists of two images plus a hotel information section, which is contained within an <aside> HTML element using the frontpage-sidebar class, rather than a <div>:


			    <aside id="frontpage-sidebar">
			    <div class="gk-photo-grid no-margin widget">
			    <div class="figure gk-grid-1" style="visibility: visible; ">
			    <img src="First Sidebar Image URL" alt="hotel1" width="400" height="234" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-76" />
			    </div>
			    <div class="figure gk-grid-1" style="visibility: visible; ">
			    <img src="Second Sidebar Image URL" alt="hotel2" width="399" height="235" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-77" />
			    </div>
			    </div>

			    <div class="border-title widget">
			    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Sidebar Text Title</span></h3>
			    <div class="content">
			    <ul class="gk-info">
			    <li class="gk-info-col-2">
			    <dl>
			    <dt>First Large Information Title</dt>
			    <dd><strong>First Large Information Text</strong></dd>
			    </dl>
			    </li>
			    <li>
			    <dl class="gk-info-col-2">
			    <dt>Second Large Information Title</dt>
			    <dd><strong>Second Large Information Text</strong></dd>
			    </dl>
			    </li>
			    <li>
			    <dl>
			    <dt>First Small Title</dt> 
			    <dd>First Small Text</dd>
			    </dl>
			    </li>
			    <li>
			    <dl>
			    <dt>Second Small Title</dt>
			    <dd>Second Small Text</dd>
			    <dd>Second Small Text</dd>
			    </dl>
			    </li>
			    <li>
			    <dl>
			    <dt>Third Small Title</dt>
			    <dd>Third Small Text</dd>
			    <dd>Third Small Text</dd>
			    </dl>
			    </li>
			    </ul>
			    </div>
			    </div>
			    </aside>
			

Now let's look at these two sections more closely to see how they work. The frontpage center column's HTML code after the opening <div> begins with the small title for the section, which is contained in a set of <span> tags wrapped in an <h3> tag that uses the widget-title class to set the font size slightly lower than standard:


			    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Modern Accommodations</span></h3>
			

And that's immediately followed by the larger main title, which is in a simple <h2> tag:


			    <h2>Stay in luxury and style</h2>
			

Now comes the start of the text; a <div> tag wraps the text section and uses the gk-cols class to split it into two equally-sized columns as defined in the data-cols attribute:


				<div class="gk-cols" data-cols="2">
			

Next is the <div> that creates the first column of text; this also uses the gk-text-justified class, which applies some CSS rules to keep the text centered within its column, like a newspaper article. Then comes the text itself, which is contained in plain <p> tags, and the closing </div> tag:

 
				<div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus. Curabitur at enim at ipsum posuere eleifend. Nullam pharetra diam id mollis scelerisque. Sed erat mauris, sodales nec est a, tincidunt lacinia purus. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.</p></div>
			

The second column of text is created similarly to the first section; opening <div> with gk-text-justified class, <p> tags for the text, however, there are two additional tags used within the <p> tags to create a quote and citation:

quotation text in the hotel theme

A set of <cite> tags wraps the quotation & citation, and within these tags is a set of <small> tags that wrap the citation text so that it can be styled differently from the quote text. Finally, the text and the second column are ended with the closing <p> and </div> tags:

 
				<div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus. Curabitur at enim at ipsum posuere eleifend.<cite>"500 World’s Best Hotels 2015"<small>-Trip Magazine</small></cite></p></div>
			

Now that both columns of text have been created, the column section ends with another closing </div> tag:


				</div>
			

With the text section finished, the block where the images will be placed is next. A new <div> is added with a gk-photo-grid class that applies the styling to the image layout, and an offset-left class that adds spacing to ensure the images are placed appropriately at all screen sizes:


				<div class="gk-photo-grid offset-left">
			

Now each of the images will be added. Each image will consist of two main components; a <div> element with a special CSS class that wraps the entire image, and a "[Caption]" shortcode that containing the <img> tag, that creates the image and sets the width & height, and the caption text that appears overlaid on the image. Let's look at how the first, larger image in the grid is created. First, a <div> is created with two classes attached; figure and gk-grid-1, which are used to place and align the images across a responsive layout:


			    <div class="figure gk-grid-1" data-sr="scale up 10%">
			

Next comes the caption shortcode; inside the opening brackets is an id attribute for CSS targeting, and a width setting that defines the max width of the container:


			    [caption id="attachment_65" align="alignnone" width="840"]
			

Then comes the <img> tag, that functions as normal; the src attribute defines the image used, and width and height attributes set the maximum size of the image to keep it balanced with the other images in the grid. There are also two classes set; size-full and wp-image-65


			    <img src="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel3.jpg" alt="Luxury Rooms" width="840" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-65" />
			

Finally, before the closing shortcode is the text for the caption, and then the first image block of the grid is closed with a closing </div> tag:


			    Luxury Rooms[/caption]
    			</div>
			

Now comes the smaller images of the grid; the HTML code will be very similar to the larger image, with some differences in the classes applied in order to target the CSS appropriately. First off


			    <div class="figure gk-grid-2" data-sr="scale up 10% and wait .15s">
    			[caption id="attachment_70" align="alignnone" width="394"]<img src="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel5.jpg" alt="Bathrooms" width="394" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-70" /> Bathrooms[/caption]
    			</div>

    			<div class="figure gk-grid-2" data-sr="scale up 10% and wait .3s">
			    [caption id="attachment_69" align="alignnone" width="394"]<img src="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel4.jpg" alt="Jacuzzi" width="394" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-69" /> Jacuzzi[/caption]
			    </div>
			    </div>

			    </div>
			

Notice that both the images added here utilize the gk-grid-2 class, which is used to align the smaller images. Otherwise, the other tags here are the same, with a caption shortcode, width and height attributes and caption text. After this, the main column is closed with a set of closing </div> tags:


			    </div>
    			</div>

			    </div>
			

With the main section finished, we can move on to the sidebar content. This is much simpler in terms of HTML than the main section, but there are some extra elements that make it a bit more complex than our earlier themes. The first thing you'll see for this part of the HTML code is an <aside> tag that uses the frontpage-sidebar class; this wraps all of the sidebar content and is used to separate the sidebar content from the main content:


				<aside id="frontpage-sidebar">
			

After this is the image grid, which this time consists of two images. The image grid is wrapped by <div> element with the gk-photo-grid, no-margin and widget classes:


				<div class="gk-photo-grid no-margin widget">
			

Then comes the image content itself; like with the main section's image grid each image is added by using a <div> element with the gk-grid-1 and figure classes:


				<div class="figure gk-grid-1">
			

Followed by an <img> tag containing the link to the image, plus the width, height and classes assigned by WordPress when an image is inserted into the content:


				<img src="https://project.gavick.com/dziudek/wordpress/hotel_clean/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel1.jpg" alt="hotel1" width="400" height="234" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-76" />
			

And then the image's block is closed with the closing </div>:


				</div>
			

This format is repeated to insert the second image in the grid, with an additional closing </div> tag at the end to close out the grid section:


				<div class="figure gk-grid-1" style="visibility: visible; ">
				<img src="https://project.gavick.com/dziudek/wordpress/hotel_clean/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel2.jpg" alt="hotel2" width="399" height="235" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-77" />
				</div>
				</div> 
			

Now comes the text portion of the sidebar; this is a fairly basic piece of HTML code, but with a few different classes applied due to the differences in text style used throughout this section. First up is a new <div> with the border-title and widget classes attached, which will wrap the entire text section:


				<div class="border-title widget">
			

After this is the section title, which is made up of text with a dividing line after the text. The title is created using an <h3> tag with the widget-title class attached, and a plain <span> tag within it that contains the title text:


				<h3 class="widget-title"><span>Hotel information</span></h3>
			

Next is the check-in and checkout times; since this information is important the text is quite differently styled from the rest of the section, with large timings that are easy for users to spot. Before creating this text though, the HTML code first creates a new <div> with the content class attached, followed by a <ul> unordered list tag with a gk-info, which creates a list that will be used to separate the rest of the content:


				<div class="content">
				<ul class="gk-info">
			

Next, the check-in time is created. A new list item <li> tag is added that uses the gk-info-col-2 class, which is used to sort the content into columns within the previously-created gk-info block:


				<li class="gk-info-col-2">
			

Then, a description list <dl> tag is opened, and a description term <dt> added that defines the text above the time (in this case, "Check-in:"):


				<dl>
				<dt>Check-in:</dt>
			

Then a <dd> definition tag containing a set of <strong> tags is used to add the time; the <strong> tags are used to style the text to be larger than the other <dd> items we'll see further down the code:


				<dd><strong>2:00 pm</strong></dd>
			

Then the item is closed with closing </dl> and </li> tags:


				</dl>
				</li>
			

This layout is then repeated to add the checkout time in the second column:


				<li>

				<dl class="gk-info-col-2">
				<dt>Check-out:</dt>
				<dd><strong>12:00 am</strong></dd>
				</dl>
				</li> 
			

With these main items taken care of, the rest of the code is used to add any other important hotel information and policies, such as whether pets are allowed, smoking and non-smoking room allocation and parking costs. Each item consists of a similar layout as in the check-in/checkout times, but without the additional classes to sort the items into columns and without <strong> tags, since the text needs to be smaller. So, each item will be a list item <li> containing a description list <dl>, with the <dt> definition tag used for the title of the policy to be defined, and a <dd> tag for each clause of the policy:


				<li>
				<dl>
				<dt>Smoking:</dt> 
				<dd>Non-Smoking</dd>
				</dl>
				</li>
			

Here, the policy is only non-smoking, so there is one <dd> tag. The next policy, Parking, includes two options; Self-parking and Valet parking, so two <dd> tags are used:


				<li>
				<dl>
				<dt>Parking:</dt>
				<dd>Self parking: €30.00</dd>
				<dd>Valet: €50.00</dd>
				</dl>
				</li>
			

The format is repeated once more for the pets policy:


				<li>
				<dl>
				<dt>Pets:</dt>
				<dd>Service animals allowed: Yes</dd>
				<dd>Maximum Weight: 50 lbs</dd>
				</dl>
				</li>
			

With all items added, the tags that are still open are closed, including the unordered list, the <div> elements, and finally, the <aside> tag that contained the sidebar:


				</ul>
				</div>
				</div>
				</aside>
			

Changing the Section Title and Subtitle

The title and subtitle are contained at the start of the HTML code for the page, in the <h3> and <h2> tags:


				<h3 class="widget-title"><span>Modern Accommodations</span></h3>
				<h2>Stay in luxury and style</h2>
			

Simply replace the text between these tags with your own content; remember that the text in the <h3> tags creates the smaller text on top, and the text in the <h2> tags creates the larger text underneath:


				<h3 class="widget-title"><span>Small Title Here</span></h3>
				<h2>Large Subtitle Here</h2>
			

Changing the Intro Text and Citation

The two-column intro text and citation are are created using a <div> element that uses the gk-cols class, which splits the next two <div> tags' content into two columns. Then, the text for each column is added using a combination of a <div> and a plain <p> tag, with the citation added at the end of the second column's <div> using a <cite> tag for the quote, and <small> tag for the person or organization being quoted:


				<div class="gk-cols" data-cols="2">
				<div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus. Curabitur at enim at ipsum posuere eleifend. Nullam pharetra diam id mollis scelerisque. Sed erat mauris, sodales nec est a, tincidunt lacinia purus. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.</p></div>
				<div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus. Curabitur at enim at ipsum posuere eleifend.<cite>"500 World’s Best Hotels 2015"<small>-Trip Magazine</small></cite></p></div>
				</div>
			

Change the content in the <p> tags for each column as needed. If you wish to keep the quote/citation layout, then add the quote text after the opening <cite> tag, and the name of the person being quoted in the <small> tags:


				<div class="gk-cols" data-cols="2">
				<div class="gk-text-justified"><p>First Column Text</p></div>
				<div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Second Column Text<cite>"Quote Text"<small>-Citation Name</small></cite></p></div>
				</div>  
			

If you do not wish to use the quote text in this section, simply remove the <cite> tag from the end of the code and all the text inside:


				<div class="gk-cols" data-cols="2">
				<div class="gk-text-justified"><p>First Column Text</p></div>
				<div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Second Column Text</p></div>
				</div>      
			

Changing the Photo Grid Images

Under the two-column intro text is a set of three images; one large with two smaller ones underneath. Because of the layout the HTML includes some more complex elements than just plain <img> tags; instead the whole image grid section is wrapped in a <div> element, with each image wrapped in another <div>, all of which are used for styling and layout purposes:


				<div class="gk-photo-grid offset-left">
				<div class="figure gk-grid-1" data-sr="scale up 10%">
				[caption id="attachment_273" align="alignnone" width="832"]<a href="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Contact.png"><img src="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Contact-832x1024.png" alt="Caption Images" width="832" height="1024" class="size-large wp-image-273" /></a> Caption Images[/caption]
				</div>

				<div class="figure gk-grid-2" data-sr="scale up 10% and wait .15s">
				[caption id="attachment_70" align="alignnone" width="394"]<img src="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel5.jpg" alt="Bathrooms" width="394" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-70" /> Bathrooms[/caption]
				</div>

				<div class="figure gk-grid-2" data-sr="scale up 10% and wait .3s">
				[caption id="attachment_69" align="alignnone" width="394"]<img src="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel4.jpg" alt="Jacuzzi" width="394" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-69" /> Jacuzzi[/caption]
				</div>
				</div>
			

To replace the images with your own, rather than inserting your own image link into the src attribute of each <img> tag as would normally be the case, we can instead take advantage of the standard WordPress Add Media function. To do so, first we'll need to remove the existing image; this means the "caption" shortcode and everything in between e.g. if we wanted to replace the second image in the code:


				<div class="figure gk-grid-2" data-sr="scale up 10% and wait .15s">
				[caption id="attachment_70" align="alignnone" width="394"]<img src="http://localhost/WordPress/Quickstarts/Hotel/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel5.jpg" alt="Bathrooms" width="394" height="434" class="size-full wp-image-70" /> Bathrooms[/caption]
				</div>
			

We would need to delete the caption shortcode starting at the "[caption" part of the code and finishing at the closing "[/caption]" part:


				<div class="figure gk-grid-2" data-sr="scale up 10% and wait .15s">

				</div>
			

Once done we'll need to insert our new image. Make sure the cursor is placed in the space where the deleted image was before, then click on the Add Media button above the editor to open your Media Library. here you can click on the image you wish to use in the grid; a list of options will appear in the sidebar where you can add a caption if desired, and set the size of the image (full-size, medium etc...). Once done, click on the Insert Into Page button in the bottom-right of the page to insert the image; WordPress will automatically add the relevant code to do so.

Bear in mind when doing this that the size of the image matters; the section has a maximum width of approx. 800px, so images larger than this width will be automatically resized. However, the height is not affected; if you use an image that has a very high vertical size it will increase the overall size of the image grid, which won't look so good when aligned with the sidebar and other page content. As a general rule you should aim to match the existing sizes as used in the demo layout for best results.

Changing the Sidebar Images

The images in the sidebar use a much simpler HTML layout, with the images defined in standard <img> tags:


				<div class="gk-photo-grid no-margin widget">
				<div class="figure gk-grid-1">
				<img src="https://wordpress/hotel_clean/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel1.jpg" alt="hotel1" width="400" height="234" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-76" />
				</div>
				<div class="figure gk-grid-1" style="visibility: visible; ">
				<img src="https://wordpress/hotel_clean/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/hotel2.jpg" alt="hotel2" width="399" height="235" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-77" />
				</div>
				</div>
			

Simply replace the URL for the src attribute in the <img> tags with your own image URL; you may find the URL for any image in your media library by clicking on Media in your WordPress backend to open the library, then clicking on the image you wish to use; in the details screen that opens you'll see the URL for the image in the URL field in the top-right of the screen, which you can copy and paste into your content.

Changing the Hotel Information Title

The Hotel Information title in the sidebar is generated in the first set of <h3> and <span> tags after the sidebar images, just after a <div> element with the border-title and widget classes:


				<div class="border-title widget">
				<h3 class="widget-title"><span>Hotel information</span></h3>
			

Swap the text between the <h3> tags to modify the title text accordingly:


				<div class="border-title widget">
				<h3 class="widget-title"><span>Section Title Here</span></h3>
			

Changing the Hotel Information Entries

The entries for the hotel information section uses a unordered list to wrap the entire group of entries, with each entry consisting of a list item <li> tag that contains a description list <dl>; inside this list is a <dt> tag that contains the name of the item such as "Smoking", and a <dd> tag that contains the policy text, such as "Non-Smoking":


				<li>
				<dl>
				<dt>Smoking:</dt> 
				<dd>Non-Smoking</dd>
				</dl>
				</li>
				<li> 
			

To modify a particular policy, simply change the text between the <dt> and <dd> tags accordingly. To add a new policy to this section, this format should be copied and pasted into the end of the section's HTML code, before the closing </ul> tag:


				<li>
				<dl>
				<dt>New Title:</dt> 
				<dd>New Policy Text</dd>
				</dl>
				</li>
				<li>
				</ul>
				</div>
				</div>
				</aside>
			

To remove an existing policy completely, simply delete the entire entry from the opening <li> to the closing </li> tag.

At the top of this section is a check-in/checkout section which uses a more complex two-column layout; this is created in the same way as the other policies but with two major changes; the check-in and checkout text are separated into their own <li> tags, both of which have the gk-cols-2 class attached, which halves the width of the section so that the list item only takes up 50% of the available sidebar width; this separates the two elements into two columns. Then, the policy text in the <dd> tag is wrapped in <strong> tags, which styles the text to be larger and appear underneath the <dt> text:


				<li class="gk-info-col-2">
				<dl>
				<dt>Check-in:</dt>
				<dd><strong>2:00 pm</strong></dd>
				</dl>
				</li>
				<li>
				<dl class="gk-info-col-2">
				<dt>Check-out:</dt>
				<dd><strong>12:00 am</strong></dd>
				</dl>
				</li>
			

You may modify the text in these items the same as with the others, but care must be taken to ensure the structure and classes are not modified to avoid damaging the layout:


				<li class="gk-info-col-2">
				<dl>
				<dt>First Column Title Text:</dt>
				<dd><strong>First Column Large Text (under title)</strong></dd>
				</dl>
				</li>
				<li>
				<dl class="gk-info-col-2">
				<dt>Second Column Title Text</dt>
				<dd><strong>Second Column Large Text (under title)</strong></dd>
				</dl>
				</li> 
			

You may also duplicate this text the same way as you do the other elements; so if you wanted to add another two-column policy that defines the rack rate for your standard and superior rooms, for example, you could add this code to the hotel information section:


				<li class="gk-info-col-2">
				<dl>
				<dt>Standard Room Rack Rate:</dt>
				<dd><strong>€250 per night</strong></dd>
				</dl>
				</li>
				<li>
				<dl class="gk-info-col-2">
				<dt>Superior Room Rack Rate:</dt>
				<dd><strong>€300 per night</strong></dd>
				</dl>
				</li>
			

Don't forget to include the code for both columns when using this layout, otherwise it will create some blank space that doesn't fit with the rest of the section. There is also no technical limit to the number of policies you add to this section, but bear in mind that the more you add the larger the section becomes, which may make the sidebar larger than the main content and create some unattractive white-space.

The "Your Satisfaction is our Priority" Section

This section adds two columns of text with a large, long-form title that can introduce some core facts about your location:

the text of the your satisfaction is our priority section

This section is created using HTML code from the Third Subpage of the Frontpage:

  • Frontpage (header reservation form)
    • First Subpage (header slideshow)
    • Second Subpage ("Modern Accommodations" and hotel information text and image grid)
    • Third Subpage ("Your satisfaction is our priority" text section)
    • Fourth Subpage (bottom slideshow)
    • Fifth Subpage (room showcase)
    • Sixth Subpage (Testimonials)
    • Seventh Subpage (Blog highlights)

The basic HTML code for this section is as follows:


		    <div class="narrow title-centered">
		    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Your satisfaction is our priority</span></h3>
		    <div class="content">
		    <h3>At The Villa Bellucci, your rest experience begins and ends with a suite. Our standard accommodation is a suite starting at 720 sq. ft., nearly double the size of other Las Vegas hotel rooms.</h3>

		    <div class="gk-cols" data-cols="2">
		    <div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus. Curabitur at enim at ipsum posuere eleifend. Nullam pharetra diam id mollis scelerisque. Sed erat mauris, sodales nec est a, tincidunt lacinia purus. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.</p></div>
		    <div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus. Curabitur at enim at ipsum posuere eleifend.</p><p>Nullam pharetra diam id mollis scelerisque. Sed erat mauris, sodales nec est a, tincidunt lacinia purus. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. </p>
		    </div>
		    </div>
		    </div>
		    </div>
		

HTML Breakdown

Since this section is created entirely with text, the HTML layout is much simpler than the previous section, though the code is still slightly more complex than plain text due to the additional styling in the long title and two-column text. First off, let's look at the code with the content replaced with placeholder text to see what goes where:


			    <div class="narrow title-centered">
			    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Small Top Title</span></h3>
			    <div class="content">
			    <h3>Long-form Title</h3>

			    <div class="gk-cols" data-cols="2">
			    <div class="gk-text-justified">
			    <p>First Column Text</p></div>
			    <div class="gk-text-justified">
			    <p>Second Column First Paragraph Text</p>
			    <p>Second Column Second Paragraph Text</p>
			    </div>
			    </div>
			    </div>
			    </div>
			

The code opens with a <div> element that wraps the entirety of the section, with two classes attached; title-centered, that centers the title elements of the section, and narrow, which is used to limit the title and column width to emulate the newspaper-style text layout:


			    <div class="narrow title-centered">
			

Next is the small title text that appears at the top of the section; this is created with an <h3> tag with the widget-title class attached to modify the font size, as with the previous section. Inside this tag is a plain <span> tag, which in turn contains the small title text:


			    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Your satisfaction is our priority</span></h3>
			

After this is another <div> element with a content class attached that styles the long-form title:


			    <div class="content">
			

Next is the long-form title itself, which is created with plain <h3> tags:


			    <h3>At The Villa Bellucci, your rest experience begins and ends with a suite. Our standard accommodation is a suite starting at 720 sq. ft., nearly double the size of other Las Vegas hotel rooms.</h3>
			

Now comes the two columns of content. This is created in the same manner as the two columns of text in the Modern Accommodations section; a <div> is added with the gk-cols class attached, which splits the next two <div> elements into columns. There is also a data-cols attribute, that sets the number of columns (in this case, two):


			     <div class="gk-cols" data-cols="2">
			

Then the two columns of text are created. Each column consists of a <div> tag with the gk-text-justified class attached to control the layout, followed by standard <p> tags that contain the column text. Once all the text for the column is added it's closed with the closing </div>:


			    <div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus. Curabitur at enim at ipsum posuere eleifend. Nullam pharetra diam id mollis scelerisque. Sed erat mauris, sodales nec est a, tincidunt lacinia purus. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.</p></div>
			

Then the second column of text is added, following the same structure, though this time there are two paragraphs rather than one:


			    <div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus. Curabitur at enim at ipsum posuere eleifend.</p><p>Nullam pharetra diam id mollis scelerisque. Sed erat mauris, sodales nec est a, tincidunt lacinia purus. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. </p>
    			</div>
			

Finally, all the outstanding <div> elements are closed; that is, the columns <div>, then the content <div>, then the frontpage <div>:


			    </div>
			    </div>
			    </div>
			

Bringing the section to a close.

Changing the Small Title

The small text title that appears at the very top of the section is defined in the combination <h3> and <span> tags in the second line of the code:


			    <div class="narrow title-centered">
    			<h3 class="widget-title"><span>Your satisfaction is our priority</span></h3>
			

Replace the text between the <span> tags with your own small title:


			    <div class="narrow title-centered">
    			<h3 class="widget-title"><span>Small Top Title</span></h3>
			

Changing the Long-Form Title

The long title text is created in the second <h3> element of the code, immediately after the <div> containing the content class:


			    <div class="content">
    			<h3>At The Villa Bellucci, your rest experience begins and ends with a suite. Our standard accommodation is a suite starting at 720 sq. ft., nearly double the size of other Las Vegas hotel rooms.</h3>
			

Replace the text here with your own:


			    <div class="content">
    			<h3>Long-form Title</h3>                
			

Changing the Two Text Columns

The text columns are in self-contained <div> elements following a <div> tag with a gk-cols class attached; this is what separates the text into two columns. It's easy to spot the text columns in the demo code due to their being the only instances of plain <p> tags in the section, and the large amount of placeholder text used:


			    <div class="gk-cols" data-cols="2">     
    			<div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus. Curabitur at enim at ipsum posuere eleifend. Nullam pharetra diam id mollis scelerisque. Sed erat mauris, sodales nec est a, tincidunt lacinia purus. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.</p></div>

			    <div class="gk-text-justified"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus. Curabitur at enim at ipsum posuere eleifend.</p><p>Nullam pharetra diam id mollis scelerisque. Sed erat mauris, sodales nec est a, tincidunt lacinia purus. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. </p>
			    </div>
			

Notice that there are two <div> elements in the above code; this each one represents a column. So if you want to add text to left column, you would modify the text in the first <div> and <p> tags, and modify the text in the second tags for the right column:


			    <div class="gk-cols" data-cols="2">
			    <div class="gk-text-justified">
			    <p>First Column Text</p></div>
			    <div class="gk-text-justified">
			    <p>Second Column First Paragraph Text</p>
			    <p>Second Column Second Paragraph Text</p>
			    </div>
			

There is no limit to the number of paragraphs or their length that you may add to either column; to add more, just create another set of <p> tags and add your content. Just bear in mind that going too crazy with text will make your site look a bit too much like a newspaper!

The Bottom Slideshow

The second slideshow provides another area for displaying your images, allowing your site to highlight facilities, room layouts, local attractions and more:

the bottom slideshow of the hotel wordpress theme

This section is created using the Fourth Subpage of the Frontpage.

  • Frontpage (header reservation form)
    • First Subpage (header slideshow)
    • Second Subpage ("Modern Accommodations" and hotel information text and image grid)
    • Third Subpage ("Your satisfaction is our priority" text section)
    • Fourth Subpage (bottom slideshow)
    • Fifth Subpage (room showcase)
    • Sixth Subpage (Testimonials)
    • Seventh Subpage (Blog highlights)

As with the header slideshow, this subpage does not contain any information itself; instead, it acts as a base for subpages containing the slides.

How It Works

The bottom slideshow works in exactly the same way as the header slideshow, in that the fourth subpage acts as a blank base, and then subpages are added to the subpage, with each one creating a new slide and its content:

  • Fourth Subpage (bottom slideshow)
    • First bottom slideshow slide
    • Second bottom slideshow slide
    • Third bottom slideshow slide
    • Fourth bottom slideshow slide
    • Fifth bottom slideshow slide

So the fourth subpage that acts as the base for the slideshow doesn't have anything in it, save a title so that it can be distinguished from the other pages in the backend. The actual meat of the slides is taken from the subpages added to this base.

Each slide consists of two elements; a slide image, and a text overlay. These elements are generated from the slide subpages, with the Featured Image of the slide page providing the slide image, and the title of the slide page providing the overlaid text.

So there's a blank base subpage, which is the fourth subpage of the frontpage. To this subpage, more subpages (so technically sub-subpages!) are added, with each one including a featured image and a title, which are automatically added to the slideshow.

Changing a Slide's Image

Each slide in the bottom slideshow is created from subpages of the Bottom Slideshow page, just like in the header. To change an existing slide's image, in your WordPress backend click on Pages → All Pages to see a list of your pages, and click on the slide page you want to change; the slide title is the same as the overlaid text on the slide if you're having trouble finding the one you want to amend.

Once on the Edit Page screen, you will see the current slide image in the Featured Image section in the right sidebar. To remove the existing slide, click on the Remove Featured Image text under the image.

Once the image is removed, you can specify your new slide image. To do so, click on the Set Featured Image text in the Featured Image section. Your media library will open, and you may upload your slide or select an existing image from your library to use. Once done, click on the Save button at the top of the screen to save changes, and your new slide is ready!

When selecting an image, bear in mind your current image width and height settings (these may be set in the WordPress Customizer). If the image does not match the slideshow's set dimensions it will be cropped & zoomed to fit, which may affect the aesthetics of the slide if there are major discrepancies between the slider's settings and the image ratio.

Changing a Slide's Overlay Text

The overlaid text of a slide is taken from the title of the slide page; to change it, open the Edit Page screen for the slide you want to modify, then change the text in the Title field and click the Update button in the top-right to save changes. The new title text will automatically be added in the overlay text.

Adding a New Slide

To add new slides to the bottom slideshow you'll just add new subpages to the fourth subpage, including the title and featured image for the slide. First click on Pages → Add New in your WordPress dashboard. Once on the edit screen for your new page, look for the Page Attributes section in the right sidebar. Here, you will see there is a Parent option with a drop-down list of your pages; select your bottom slideshow base page as your new page's parent; the theme will automatically use this new subpage as a slide.

Now we need to add the slide elements. First, set the slide image by clicking on the Set Featured Image button in the Featured Image section of the right sidebar, and uploading a slide image or selecting one from your Media Library.

Next, add a title to the Title field; this will be used as the large text overlay on the slide.

Now click on the Publish button to make the page public; the slide will be automatically displayed in the header slideshow.

Note: The order of the slides in the slideshow is defined by their date of creation, so if you wish to change the order you will need to delete the older slides and recreate them in a new slide page to move them to the end.

The Room Showcase Section

The rooms showcase provides a highlight for the room types available, with an image, price and description plus a link to make a booking:

showcasing available room types in the wordpress hotel theme

This section is created using HTML code from the Fifth Subpage of the Frontpage:

  • Frontpage (header reservation form)
    • First Subpage (header slideshow)
    • Second Subpage ("Modern Accommodations" and hotel information text and image grid)
    • Third Subpage ("Your satisfaction is our priority" text section)
    • Fourth Subpage (bottom slideshow)
    • Fifth Subpage (room showcase)
    • Sixth Subpage (Testimonials)
    • Seventh Subpage (Blog highlights)

And the basic code used in the demo layout is as follows:


		    <h3 class="widget-title regular-space"><span>Modern Accommodations</span></h3>
		    <h3>Villa Bellucci has 264 elegantly furnished and air conditioned classic rooms, <br>ideal for business and leisure travellers.</h3>

		    [gknsp use_css="off" cache_time="0" article_format="rooms.format" widget_css_suffix="offers" article_cols="3" article_rows="1" article_block_padding="60px 5px 20px 5px" article_image_w="400" article_image_h="240" data_source_type="wp-custom" post_types_list="gk_rooms" orderby="date" order="ASC" article_text_len="24"]
		

HTML Breakdown

The HTML code for this section can actually be split into two distinct parts, only the first part of which is HTML. First off, let's change the HTML code to use placeholder text instead of the demo text so it's easier to see where everything goes:


			    <h3 class="widget-title regular-space"><span>Small Title</span></h3>
	    		<h3>Introductory Text</h3>

			    [gknsp Shortcode Attributes Here]
			

The first part is very simple and provides the introductory title and text:


			    <h3 class="widget-title regular-space"><span>Modern Accommodations</span></h3>
	    		<h3>Villa Bellucci has 264 elegantly furnished and air conditioned classic rooms, <br>ideal for business and leisure travellers.</h3>
			

Whilst the second part isn't HTML; instead, it's a shortcode that creates an instance of our News Show Pro widget, which provides previews of your posts:

    
				[gknsp use_css="off" cache_time="0" article_format="rooms.format" widget_css_suffix="offers" article_cols="3" article_rows="1" article_block_padding="60px 5px 20px 5px" article_image_w="400" article_image_h="240" data_source_type="wp-custom" post_types_list="gk_rooms" orderby="date" order="ASC" article_text_len="24"]
			

In this case, it has been specifically set-up to display previews of your room pages, which are created using the Rooms plugin (more information on this plugin may be found in the Theme Features section of this guide). Let's examine the opening HTML code first. It opens with an <h3> tag that has two classes attached; widget-title, which sets the font size to be smaller than the standard, and regular-space, which controls the padding and spacing around the title. Within this tag is a plain <span> tag that surrounds the title text itself:


			    <h3 class="widget-title regular-space"><span>Modern Accommodations</span></h3>
			

Next comes the larger intro text; this is just a plain <h3> tag containing the text, with a <br> tag used to move the text to a new line where needed:


			    <h3>Villa Bellucci has 264 elegantly furnished and air conditioned classic rooms, <br>ideal for business and leisure travellers.</h3>
			

After this is the News Show Pro shortcode:


			    [gknsp use_css="off" cache_time="0" article_format="rooms.format" widget_css_suffix="offers" article_cols="3" article_rows="1" article_block_padding="60px 5px 20px 5px" article_image_w="400" article_image_h="240" data_source_type="wp-custom" post_types_list="gk_rooms" orderby="date" order="ASC" article_text_len="24"]
			

It probably looks rather complex, but once you understand how the shortcode works it becomes much clearer. Let's break it down; we start with the basic shortcode:


			    [gknsp]
			

What this shortcode does is creates an instance of the News Show Pro widget in your page content, or in this case, in your frontpage content. However, this basic shortcode will create the widget with all the default settings, which won't match the theme at all. If this was a standard widget we could open the widget options and change them to suit our needs, but since this is a shortcode any option changes will need to be added as attributes, using the following format:


			    [gknsp Option_name="New_Option_Value"]
			

So if we want to set the cache time to "100", we would change the basic shortcode to:


			    [gknsp cache_time="100"]
			

More options can be added one after another in the shortcode until all the options have been set. In the demo content, the following attributes are added:

  • use_css - This option decides whether the default CSS for the widget is loaded. Villa Bellucci has its own CSS that's specific to the theme, so this option is set to Off in the demo content.
  • cache_time - This option sets how long the widget settings should be stored in cache. In the demo this is set to 0 so users will always see the latest version of the widget every time they visit, including any new styling or articles.
  • article_format - This option is used to specify the type of article being showcased; because this section is displaying showcases from the special Rooms plugin, this option is set to rooms.format.
  • widget_css_suffix - One of the most important options, this lets you define CSS suffixes specific to the widget so that you can target your CSS rules directly. The demo content specifies one suffix; offers, which provides most of the CSS styling of the section.
  • article_cols & article_rows - Another two important options; these two attributes sets the number of columns and rows that NSP should create, which in turn defines the number of showcases. For example, in the demo content article_cols is set to 3 and article_rows is set to 1, so there's a single row of three room previews. By modifying these settings you can change the number of showcases.
  • article_block_padding - This option lets you set the padding for the articles in pixels; up to four numbers can be entered to represent the padding for the top, right, bottom and left margins in turn. In the demo content this is set as 60px 5px 20px 5px.
  • article_image_w - Defines the width of the article showcase image in pixels. In the demo content this is set to 400.
  • article_image_h - Defines the height of the article showcase image in pixels. Set to 240 in the demo content.
  • data_source_type - This option is used to specify the data source, or where the widget should look for articles to display. This can be set to pull from particular categories, specific posts and more. In the demo content, this option is set to wp-custom, as the Rooms plugin is not a standard WordPress source.
  • post_types_list - This option works in tandem with the data source type option to set which particular posts should be showcased. For example, if the data source is set as categories, then this option will specify which categories. In the demo content, this option is set to gk_rooms, which pulls from the Rooms plugin.
  • orderby - Sets the ordering for the showcased posts. This can be set to sort items by ID, date etc...In the demo content, this option is set to date.
  • order - Sets whether the ordering defined in the orderby attribute is ascending or descending. In the demo content this is set to ASC (ascending).
  • article_text_len - This option sets the length of the preview text (in number of words) that each article showcase displays. Set to 10 in the demo.

Once all of these attributes are added to the shortcode the rooms showcase will look like the demo, but there are a huge amount of extra options available; more details can be found in this News Show Pro-focused blog article.

Changing the Small Title

The small title that appears at the top of the section is created, like in several other frontpage sections, in the combination <h3> and <span> tags that being the HTML code of the page:


			    <h3 class="widget-title regular-space"><span>Modern Accommodations</span></h3>
			

So simply replace the text between the <span> tags with your own text:


			    <h3 class="widget-title regular-space"><span>Small Title</span></h3>
			

Changing the Intro Text

After the small title is some larger introductory text that appears before the room showcases; this text is taken from the plain <h3> tags that appear after the small title's tags:


			    <h3>Villa Bellucci has 264 elegantly furnished and air conditioned classic rooms, <br>ideal for business and leisure travellers.</h3>
			

So just replace the text between these tags with your own:


			    <h3>Introductory Text</h3>
			

Adding More Article Showcases

In the default News Show Pro settings three room showcases are displayed; one row of three columns. If you have more or less room types to display in the showcase section we will need to change the number of rows and columns to match our required layout; this is achieved by modifying the article_cols (for columns) and article_rows (for rows) attribute. In the demo layout they are set to three and one respectively:


				article_cols="2" article_rows="2"
			

Which creates three showcases. Depending on your requirements, you can choose to expand your number of showcases by adding extra rows, or extra columns. For example, let's say we wanted four rooms showcased in a single row; we'd leave the number of rows at one, but change the number of columns to four:


				article_cols="4" article_rows="1"
			

Whereas if we wanted six showcases over two rows, we'd change the rows to two, but leave the columns as three:


				article_cols="3" article_rows="2"
			

Something that is important to note is that the height of block that contains the showcases is fluid, while the width is not. This means that if you add more columns, then there will be less total space for each showcase i.e. if you have two columns then both columns are set at 50% of the available width. By adding a third column, each column will be reduced to 33% of the available width. This means that when adding more columns you'll likely need to reduce the length of the text previews to ensure it remains visually-appealing.

This is why it's generally a good idea to expand this section vertically by adding more rows, rather than adding more columns that have limited useable space.

Changing Preview Text Lengths

If you want to increase or reduce the length of the preview text you will need to modify the article_text_len attribute. In the demo content the text length is defined in number of words; simply modify the value of the attribute according. So if you wanted to have a preview text length of ten words, the shortcode would look like this:


				[gknsp article_text_len="10"]
			

The Testimonials Section

This section looks like a slideshow at first, but it's actually a static background with rotating testimonial text; great for showing off your happy customer comments:

customer testimonial section in the hotel wordpress theme

The HTML code for this section is taken from the Sixth Subpage of the Frontpage:

  • Frontpage (header reservation form)
    • First Subpage (header slideshow)
    • Second Subpage ("Modern Accommodations" and hotel information text and image grid)
    • Third Subpage ("Your satisfaction is our priority" text section)
    • Fourth Subpage (bottom slideshow)
    • Fifth Subpage (room showcase)
    • Sixth Subpage (Testimonials)
    • Seventh Subpage (Blog highlights)

And the basic HTML code used is:


		    <figure data-zindex="1">
		    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
		    <div>
		    <blockquote>
		    Pellentesque egestas tellus ipsum, a cursus nunc maximus quis. 
		    Maecenas suscipit libero a euismod fringilla. Suspendisse ut est a mi luctus euismod ut eu nisl.
		    <cite>Robert Gavick</strong></cite>
		    </div>
		    </figcaption >
		    </figure>

		    <figure data-zindex="2">
		    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
		    <div>
		    <blockquote>
		    Maecenas suscipit libero a euismod fringilla. Suspendisse ut est a mi luctus euismod ut eu nisl. Pellentesque egestas tellus ipsum, a cursus nunc maximus quis.
		    <cite>John Doe</strong></cite>
		    <div>
		    </figcaption>
		    </figure>
		

HTML Breakdown

After some of the in-depth code and shortcodes of the past few sections, the code for the testimonials is much simpler! As always, we'll start by replacing the demo content with placeholder text:


			    <figure data-zindex="1">
			    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
			    <div>
			    <blockquote>
			    First Quote Text
			    <cite>First Quote Citation</strong></cite>
			    </div>
			    </figcaption >
			    </figure>

			    <figure data-zindex="2">
			    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
			    <div>
			    <blockquote>
			    Second Quote Text
			    <cite>Second Quote Citation</strong></cite>
			    <div>
			    </figcaption>
			    </figure>
			

As you can tell, the majority of the tags are for applying the CSS reveal effects; the actual text content is very simple to modify. Let's break it down:

First things first; the background image is taken from the Featured Image of the page, so the HTML deals only with the testimonials. However, since the testimonials rotate like slides, there's a bit more HTML structure than you'd find in a plain, non-rotating testimonial section. Each testimonial follows the same pattern; first, a <figure> tag is created that will contain all the required elements of the testimonial:


			    <figure data-zindex="1">
			

Notice that it has an attribute; data-zindex, which is set to one. This attribute defines the order of the testimonials in ascending order, so the testimonial with data-zindex of one is first, the testimonial with two is second etc...

Next is a <figcaption> tag that contains two classes used to style the testimonial, site and mode-testimonial:


			    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
			

Then comes a opening <div> tag that will wrap the quote, followed by a <blockquote> tag that contains the quote text:


			    <div>
			    <blockquote>
			    Pellentesque egestas tellus ipsum, a cursus nunc maximus quis. 
			    Maecenas suscipit libero a euismod fringilla. Suspendisse ut est a mi luctus euismod ut eu nisl.
			

And the citation name is added using a <cite> tag, before the testimonial is closed:


			    <cite>First Quote Citation</cite>
			    </div>
			    </figcaption>
			    </figure>   
			

For the second testimonial, the same structure is repeated but the data-zindex attribute is set to two:


			    <figure data-zindex="2">
			    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
			    <div>
			    <blockquote>
			    Maecenas suscipit libero a euismod fringilla. Suspendisse ut est a mi luctus euismod ut eu nisl. Pellentesque egestas tellus ipsum, a cursus nunc maximus quis.
			    <cite>John Doe</strong></cite>
			    <div>
			    </figcaption>
			    </figure>
			

Which ends the section.

Changing the Testimonial Text

Each testimonial's text is set after the <blockquote> tag in the fourth line of the code:


			    <figure data-zindex="1">
			    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
			    <div>
			    <blockquote>
			    Pellentesque egestas tellus ipsum, a cursus nunc maximus quis. 
			    Maecenas suscipit libero a euismod fringilla. Suspendisse ut est a mi luctus euismod ut eu nisl.
			

Simply replace this text with your own for each quote you wish to change:


			    <figure data-zindex="1">
			    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
			    <div>
			    <blockquote>
			    Quote Text
			

Changing the Testimonial Citation

The citations (the name that appears under the quote to show who said it) is created in the <cite> tags immediately after the end of the quote text:


			    <blockquote>
			    Pellentesque egestas tellus ipsum, a cursus nunc maximus quis. 
			    Maecenas suscipit libero a euismod fringilla. Suspendisse ut est a mi luctus euismod ut eu nisl.
			    <cite>Robert Gavick</strong></cite>
			

Replace the text between these tags as needed:


			    <blockquote>
    			First Quote Text
    			<cite>First Quote Citation</strong></cite>
			

Adding/Removing Testimonials

Each testimonial is contained in a <figure> tag, with all the elements between them:


			    <figure data-zindex="1">
			    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
			    <div>
			    <blockquote>
			    First Quote Text
			    <cite>First Quote Citation</strong></cite>
			    </div>
			    </figcaption >
			    </figure>
			

So to add new testimonials, you need only recreate this structure (just copying and pasting it is fine), change the content, and add it to the end of the existing code. However, there is one additional step that you will need to take whenever adding a new testimonial; in the opening <figure> there is a data-zindex attribute; this attribute's value corresponds to the order that the testimonials appear, so the first testimonial is set to one, the second to two and so on. Because of this, when creating an additional testimonial it is necessary to change the data-zindex value to match the next available number i.e. if you have two testimonials:


			    <figure data-zindex="1">
			    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
			    <div>
			    <blockquote>
			    First Quote Text
			    <cite>First Quote Citation</strong></cite>
			    </div>
			    </figcaption >
			    </figure>

			    <figure data-zindex="2">
			    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
			    <div>
			    <blockquote>
			    Second Quote Text
			    <cite>Second Quote Citation</strong></cite>
			    <div>
			    </figcaption>
			    </figure>
			

When you add a third its data-zindex should be set to three:


			    <figure data-zindex="1">
			    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
			    <div>
			    <blockquote>
			    First Quote Text
			    <cite>First Quote Citation</strong></cite>
			    </div>
			    </figcaption >
			    </figure>

			    <figure data-zindex="2">
			    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
			    <div>
			    <blockquote>
			    Second Quote Text
			    <cite>Second Quote Citation</strong></cite>
			    <div>
			    </figcaption>
			    </figure>

			    <figure data-zindex="3">
			    <figcaption class="site mode-testimonial">
			    <div>
			    <blockquote>
			    Third Quote Text
			    <cite>Third Quote Citation</strong></cite>
			    </div>
			    </figcaption >
			    </figure>
			

There is no limit to the number of testimonials you may add to this section, so feel free to add as many as needed. To remove a testimonial, you need only delete the relevant block; though you must also remember to adjust the data-zindex attributes according. For example, if there are three quotes as in the above code, and the second testimonial is deleted, then the third testimonials data-zindex must be changed to two.

The Blog Highlights Section

This section provides showcases for your blog articles:

blog highlights as displayed on the hotel theme frontpage

This section's HTML code is taken from the Seventh Subpage of the Frontpage:

  • Frontpage (header reservation form)
    • First Subpage (header slideshow)
    • Second Subpage ("Modern Accommodations" and hotel information text and image grid)
    • Third Subpage ("Your satisfaction is our priority" text section)
    • Fourth Subpage (bottom slideshow)
    • Fifth Subpage (room showcase)
    • Sixth Subpage (Testimonials)
    • Seventh Subpage (Blog highlights)

And the HTML code as used in the demo looks like this:


		    <div class="regular-space narrow title-centered">
		    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Private Events & Meetings</span></h3>
		    <div class="content">
		    <h3>We understand planning successful events requires continued connections 
		    to your team and guests. Villa helps perfect your entire show.</h3>

		    [gknsp use_css="off" cache_time="0" article_format="hotel-blog.format" widget_css_suffix="category-layout" article_cols="1" article_rows="2" article_block_padding="75px 0" article_title_len="32" article_title_len_type="chars" article_text_len="30" article_image_w="320" article_image_h="440" article_info_date_format="l, d F Y" orderby="date"]
		    </div>
		    </div>
		

HTML Breakdown

Just like the Rooms Showcase section, the code in this section can be split into two distinct parts; the normal HTML content that creates the small title and introductory text, and a shortcode that creates an instance of the News Show Pro widget. Let's remove the demo content and replace it with placeholder text to see how this is laid out:


			    <div class="regular-space narrow title-centered">
			    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Small Title</span></h3>
			    <div class="content">
			    <h3>Introductory Text</h3>

			    [gknsp Shortcode Attributes Here]
			    </div>
			    </div>
			

The section starts with a <div> element that surrounds the entire section; it includes three classes that add some important styling and layout CSS to the section; regular-space, which controls the padding used throughout the section, narrow, which reduces the width of the section to create a narrower set of columns for the showcases, and title-centered, which centers the text for a symmetrical look.


			    <div class="regular-space narrow title-centered">
			

Then comes the small title; just like the small titles seen in the earlier frontpage sections this is created with a combination of an <h3> tag with the widget-title class to set the font-size, and a <span> tag that contains the small title text:


			    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Private Events & Meetings</span></h3>
			

After this is another <div>that will wrap the introductory text and News Show Pro showcases, with a content class attached:


			    <div class="content">
			

Then the introductory text is added in a set of <h3> tags:


			    <h3>We understand planning successful events requires continued connections 
    			to your team and guests. Villa helps perfect your entire show.</h3>
			

Now comes the News Show Pro shortcode; this is functionally the same as the shortcode used in the Rooms Showcase section, but there are several differences in terms of attributes to set the different layout. As before, the basic shortcode is as follows:


			    [gknsp]
			

And attributes are added before the closing brackets to change the default options. The attributes used in the demo content are:

  • use_css - This option decides whether the default CSS for the widget is loaded. Villa Bellucci has its own CSS that's specific to the theme, so this option is set to Off in the demo content.
  • cache_time - This option sets how long the widget settings should be stored in cache. In the demo this is set to 0 so users will always see the latest version of the widget every time they visit, including any new styling or articles.
  • article_format - This option is used to specify the type of article being showcased; because this section is displaying showcases from the special Rooms plugin, this option is set to hotel-blog.format.
  • widget_css_suffix - One of the most important options, this lets you define CSS suffixes specific to the widget so that you can target your CSS rules directly. The demo content specifies one suffix; category-layout, which provides most of the CSS styling of the section.
  • article_cols & article_rows - Another two important options; these two attributes sets the number of columns and rows that NSP should create, which in turn defines the number of showcases. For example, in the demo content article_cols is set to 1 and article_rows is set to 2, so there's one column of two blog showcases.
  • article_block_padding - This option lets you set the padding for the articles in pixels; up to four numbers can be entered to represent the padding for the top, right, bottom and left margins in turn. In the demo content this is set as 75px 0.
  • article_title_len - Sets the length of the title (in characters or words) of the article showcase. Set to 32 in the demo.
  • article_title_len_type - Defines whether the article_title_len attribute refers to total characters or total words; in the demo this is set to chars, or characters.
  • article_text_len - This option sets the length of the preview text (in number of words) that each article showcase displays. Set to 30 in the demo.
  • article_image_w - Defines the width of the article showcase image in pixels. In the demo content this is set to 320.
  • article_image_h - Defines the height of the article showcase image in pixels. Set to 440 in the demo content.
  • article_text_len - This option sets the length of the preview text (in number of words) that each article showcase displays. Set to 10 in the demo.
  • article_info_date_format - Defines the format of the date that is listed under the title of the blog post in the showcase. In the demo content this is set to l, d F Y.
  • orderby - Sets the ordering for the showcased posts. This can be set to sort items by ID, date etc...In the demo content, this option is set to date.

After all the attributes are added, the section is closed out with two closing </div> tags:


			    </div>
    			</div>
			

The attributes listed above are just a few of the available options; more details can be found in this News Show Pro-focused blog article.

Changing the Small Title

Like the other frontpage sections, the small title is contained in a <span> tag inside an <h3> tag that has the widget-title class attached:


			    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Private Events & Meetings</span></h3>
			

Simply add your own text between these tags:


			    <h3 class="widget-title"><span>Small Title</span></h3>
			

Changing the Intro Text

The intro text is contained in a plain set of <h3> tags immediately after the small intro text:


			    <h3>We understand planning successful events requires continued connections 
    			to your team and guests. Villa helps perfect your entire show.</h3>
			

So you may add your own text as needed:


			    <h3>Introductory Text</h3>
			

Adding More Article Showcases

In the default News Show Pro settings in Villa Belluci two articles are displayed over two rows, one for each row. To change the number of displayed articles we will need to change the number of rows to match our required layout; this is achieved by modifying the article_rows attribute (the narrow layout limits the number of columns to one, hence why we may only expand the rows). In the demo layout they are set to one column and two rows:


				article_rows="2"
			

Which produces two article showcases. By changing the number of rows, you can add additional showcases. So if we wanted three showcases, we would change the attribute to three:


				article_rows="3"
			

Bear in mind that the size of the previews means that each one added significantly increases the overall height of the section, so it is advisable to avoid adding too many rows.

Changing the Data Source

The standard settings used in the demo content does not specify data sources, so this leaves the options as default. The default behavior of News Show Pro is to display your latest WordPress posts from all categories. However, you may find that you'd prefer blog posts from a specific category are highlighted only, or that specific posts are highlighted for complete control of your frontpage. In these cases, we'll need to add some additional attributes to define the data source behavior.

First, we need to define the type of data source; we'll do this by adding a data_source_type attribute to the NSP shortcode using the following format:


				data_source_type="wp-source"
			

Where source defines the type of source (category, tags etc...). There are several available options here, but we'll likely want to use one of the following:

  • wp-latest - Set the source as the latest posts on all categories (default behavior).
  • wp-category - Sets the source as one of your WordPress post categories.
  • wp-post - Allows you to specify particular posts to be displayed.

After adding the data_source_type attribute, you'll need to define the category/tag/posts that you want NSP to pull from. To do this, we'll need to add a data_source attribute (for posts) or a wp_category_list attribute (for categories).

If you're using the data_source attribute to define specific posts to display, you will need to add either the slugs of the chosen posts, or the ID number. To find the slug of a particular post, click on Posts → All Posts in your WordPress backend. In the list of posts, hover your cursor over the post you want to find the slug for to see a set of options. Click on the Quick Edit option to open a new set of fields; the second field contains the slug, so you can copy and paste this into the value:

finding a post slug in the wordpress post list

For example, in the demo content there is a post called "The Villa Belluci set to reopen after renovation", and the slug for this post is "the-villa-belluci-set-to-reopen". If we wanted NSP to show only that post, we would use the following shortcode:


				[gknsp data_source_type="wp-post" data_source="the-villa-belluci-set-to-reopen"]
			

If you're using the wp_category_list attribute to define a category that articles should be pulled from, then you'll need to find the ID of the category you wish to use. To do so, click on Posts → Categories to see a list of categories, and click on the category you wish to use to be taken to the Edit Category screen. Now check the URL of the page; you'll notice that towards the end of the URL there's a section that looks like this:


				&tag_ID=x
			

Where "x" is a number.

finding the category id in wordpress

This is the category ID; add this number as the value of the wp_category_list attribute and save changes; NSP will now automatically display the latest posts from this category as you add them. For example, in the demo content the blog category has an ID of 3; to display this category's posts only in NSP, the shortcode would look like this:


				[gknsp data_source="wp-category" wp_category_list="3"]
			

Note: You can add multiple category IDs or post slugs to these attributes as needed; just separate each ID or slug with a comma.

Changing Preview Text Lengths

If you modify the number of showcases via the row changes described above, you may find that your titles or preview texts are too long, and wrap in a way that does not look attractive, or take up too many lines on the page. In this case, you can modify the length of these elements to fit their space better. To do this, you will need to modify the article_title_len attribute (for the title), and the article_text_len attribute (for the preview text). In the demo content, the title length is defined by number of characters, and the text length is defined in number of words. Simply modify their respective values in the attributes. For example, if you wanted the title to be a maximum of 30 characters long, and the preview text to be 7 words, the shortcode would look like this:


				[gknsp article_text_len="7" article_title_len="30"]
			

Theme Features

Villa Belluci includes additional featured to help you build your hotel website, including a dedicated Rooms plugin that creates uniquely-styled pages to highlight your available rooms types, Advanced Typography that expands your writing toolset, and a gallery page layout for users to get previews of your amenities and local attractions. In this section we'll look at how each of these additional features can be used.

The Rooms Plugin

The Rooms plugin is an exclusive addition to Villa Belluci for WordPress that creates a Custom Post Type specifically for your rooms, with a unique layout separate from the standard blog style:

special rooms pages in the hotel wordpress theme

Here we'll cover all the steps you need to create your own room category and pages, as well as how to modify some of the basic settings. If you previously imported the demo content when installing the theme then you will already have an existing category and demo room pages already prepared, ready for modification.

The Rooms Category

The category you use to store your room pages is the same as creating a standard category; no additional options will need to be set. However, because there are some options behind the scenes that need to be created, it is important to make sure that any rooms categories you create are created in the Rooms plugin, and not via the standard Posts → Categories section. In the demo content a Rooms category is already created, so this step can be skipped. To create a category, click on Rooms → Categories in your WordPress dashboard's main menu to open the Categories page.

the categories page for the wordpress rooms plugin

Here, add your new category's name to the Name field under the Add New Category heading on the left, and add a description of the category in the Description box. Both of these elements are important as they will be displayed at the top of the room listing page:

the title and subtitle of the rooms category list page

Now add an identifying name in the Slug field; this may be used in URLs so it should be lowercase and contain no spaces. Instead, hyphens or underscores should be used, such as:


			    hotel-rooms
			

In the demo content the category name is set to Rooms, and the slug is the same but lowercase, rooms. Once these fields are complete click the Add New Category button at the bottom of the column and the category will be added to the list of existing categories in the right column. Your category is now ready to have some room types assigned to it.

Rooms Pages

With a category prepared for your rooms, the next step is to create your room pages. This will be functionally similar to creating standard posts, except created via the Rooms plugin and using a special HTML layout and custom post fields to add room-specific information to the page, such as room amenities. If you've installed the quickstart or demo content then you'll already have three example rooms ready to go that you can modify, or you can create a new room from scratch.

Creating a New Room Page

To create a new room page, click on Rooms → Add New in the WordPress dashboard; you will be taken to the Add New Room page, which will look exactly the same as a standard Add New Post page so it's easy to follow.

The first thing to do is add a title; this should be the name of the room type such as Superior Non-Smoking Room. The title will be displayed in the room highlights on the front page as well as the rooms category list, so make sure the name is distinct. Then, you should assign a Featured Image to the page by clicking the Add Featured Image text at the bottom of the right sidebar; this will open the media library and allow you to select an image to add to the page. This image will then be displayed at the very top of the room page, just below the title.

The last step is to create the page content; this covers everything that appears under the featured image. It's advisable to switch the editor to Text mode since we'll be copying and pasting HTML code directly into the editor. As an example, the HTML for the Standard Room in the demo content looks like this:


				    [gallery columns="8" link="file" ids="102,99,96,94,105"]
				    <p class="room-intro-text">Curabitur pulvinar nibh orci, gravida laoreet lectus vulputate volutpat. Fusce neque est, commodo et odio a, sollicitudin sollicitudin est. Maecenas in pretium tellus. Integer pharetra ex vitae odio sodales fermentum. Vestibulum viverra odio neque, sit amet fermentum enim maximus nec. Sed porta volutpat orci ac ullamcorper. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus.</p>

				    <div class="tariff-box">
				    <div class="span5">
				    <strong>Summer Holiday</strong><p>Enjoy your summer holiday at our hotel!</p></div>
				    <div class="room-price align-right ">
				    <span class="starting_from">Starting from</span><span class="min_tariff">EUR99.00</span><span class="tariff_suffix">/ room / 1 night</span>                                             </div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="info">
				    <h3>Facilities</h3>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">General</div>
				    <div class="span10">Family Rooms, Heating, Ironing facilities </div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Activities</div>
				    <div class="span10">Tennis Court, Fitness Center, Spa, Massage </div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Services</div>
				    <div class="span10">Airport Shuttle, Shuttle Service (Surcharge), Ironing Service</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Internet</div>
				    <div class="span10">Wi-Fi is available in the hotel rooms and costs EUR 5 per 24 hours.</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Parking</div>
				    <div class="span10">No parking available.</div>
				    </div>

				    <h3>Policies</h3>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Checkin</div>
				    <div class="span10">3:00 am - 9.00 pm</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Checkout</div>
				    <div class="span10">7.00 am - 9.00 pm</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Cancellation / Prepayment</div>
				    <div class="span10">Cancellation and prepayment policies vary according to apartment type. Please check the Apartment Conditions when selecting your apartment above. </div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Children and extra beds</div>
				    <div class="span10">Free! One child under 4 years stays free of charge when using existing beds. One child under 3 years is charged EUR 20 per night in a crib. One older child or adult is charged EUR 20 per night in an extra bed. The maximum number of extra beds/cribs in a room is 1. Any type of extra bed or crib is upon request and needs to be confirmed by management. Additional fees are not calculated automatically in the total cost and will have to be paid for separately during your stay.</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Pets</div>
				    <div class="span10">Pets are not allowed.</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading"> Accepted credit cards</div>
				    <div class="span10">American Express, Visa, Euro/Mastercard, Diners Club, Maestro. The hotel reserves the right to pre-authorise credit cards prior to arrival.. </div>
				    </div>
				    </div>
				
HTML Breakdown

The page code above may look rather complex and imtimidating, but this is only due to the number of amenities and information sections being added; once we understand the formatting it becomes a lot easier to follow. First off, let's replace the example text in the HTML with placeholders:


				    [gallery columns="8" link="file" ids="102,99,96,94,105"]
    				<p class="room-intro-text">Intro Text Here</p>

				    <div class="tariff-box">
				    <div class="span5">
				    <strong>Offer Name</strong><p>Offer Text</p></div>
				    <div class="room-price align-right ">
				    <span class="starting_from">Text Above Price</span><span class="min_tariff">Price</span><span class="tariff_suffix">Text Under Price</span>     
				    </div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="info">
				    <h3>Amenity Category</h3>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">First Amenity Title</div>
				    <div class="span10">First Amenity Content</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Second Amenity Title</div>
				    <div class="span10">Second Amenity Content</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Third Amenity Title</div>
				    <div class="span10">Third Amenity Content</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Fourth Amenity Title</div>
				    <div class="span10">Fourth Amenity Content</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Fifth Amenity Title</div>
				    <div class="span10">Fifth Amenity Content</div>
				    </div>

				    <h3>Policy Category</h3>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">First Policy Title</div>
				    <div class="span10">First Policy Content</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Second Policy Title</div>
				    <div class="span10">Second Policy Content</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Third Policy Title</div>
				    <div class="span10">Third Policy Content</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Fourth Policy Title</div>
				    <div class="span10">Fourth Policy Content</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Fifth Policy Title</div>
				    <div class="span10">Fifth Policy Content</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Sixth Policy Title</div>
				    <div class="span10">Sixth Policy Content</div>
				    </div>
				    </div>
				

Now if we look at the page layout we can easily match up each piece of HTML to its equivalent space on the page. The first element is of course the title; this is taken from the page title and is not part of the HTML content. This is also true of the large image that appears underneath the title, which is taken from the Featured Image of the page. After this comes the start of the content created from the HTML, starting with a gallery shortcode:


					[gallery columns="8" link="file" ids="102,99,96,94,105"] 
				

The gallery shortcode is a core feature built into WordPress that allows you to create in-article galleries using your media library; we'll look at how to use this later in this guide. This particular example creates eight images in the gallery, which has been styled to match the Villa Belluci aesthetic. Following this is a <p> tag with a intro-text class attached; this class restyles the text to make it slightly larger and distinct from the rest of the page. Inside the tag is the introductory text which appears immediately after the gallery but before the pricing boxout:


					<p class="room-intro-text">Curabitur pulvinar nibh orci, gravida laoreet lectus vulputate volutpat. Fusce neque est, commodo et odio a, sollicitudin sollicitudin est. Maecenas in pretium tellus. Integer pharetra ex vitae odio sodales fermentum. Vestibulum viverra odio neque, sit amet fermentum enim maximus nec. Sed porta volutpat orci ac ullamcorper. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus.</p>
				

After this is the price, or tariff, box, which includes some text regarding special offers and a price with text above and below to provide additional clarification on how the pricing works (such as per room per night etc...). Each element in this box is separated via <div> elements that contain different classes to style each piece of text differently. First, the tariff box area is created using a <div> element with a tariff-box class:


					<div class="tariff-box">
				

Next comes the text content to the left of the tariff box; this is created using a <div> with a span5 class (this is a Bootstrap class that defines the size of the area). Within this <div> is a pair of <strong> tags for the name of the offer, and a pair of <p> tags for the text underneath the title:


					<div class="span5">
					<strong>Summer Holiday</strong><p>Enjoy your summer holiday at our hotel!</p>
					</div>
				

Now comes the text on the right of the box. Another <div> is added with two classes attached; room-price, which assists with styling the pricing text, and align-right, which shifts the text to the right side of of the box for aesthetic reasons.


					<div class="room-price align-right ">
				

The text is then added; each line of text is added using a set of <span> tags with different classes; the text above the price uses a starting_from class, the price itself uses a min_tariff class, and the text under the price uses a tariff_suffix class, before this section is closed out with two closing </div> tags, one for the right-hand block, and the other for the entire tariff box:


					<span class="starting_from">Starting from</span><span class="min_tariff">EUR99.00</span><span class="tariff_suffix">/ room / 1 night</span>
					</div>
					</div>
				

After this is the HTML code that adds the various information listings to the bottom of the page, such as the room amenities, policies and so on. The section opens with a <div> element containing an info class:


					<div class="info">
				

This <div> wraps the rest of the content of the page. Inside it, each section of the amenities and features is created using a standardized format. Beginning with a plain set of <h3> tags that create the title for each section:


					<h3>Facilities</h3>
				

Under each title is a set of amenities, with each amenity listing created using a <div> with a row-fluid and custom-field-row classes that wraps around the amenity's code, then a second <div> with info-heading and span2 classes for the amenity title, and a final <div> with the span10 class containing the description text for the amenity:


					<div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
					<div class="span2 info-heading">General</div>
					<div class="span10">Family Rooms, Heating, Ironing facilities </div>
					</div>
				

This formatting is then repeated to add additional entries to the amenity list's category:


					<div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
					<div class="span2 info-heading">Activities</div>
					<div class="span10">Tennis Court, Fitness Center, Spa, Massage </div>
					</div>

					<div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
					<div class="span2 info-heading">Services</div>
					<div class="span10">Airport Shuttle, Shuttle Service (Surcharge), Ironing Service</div>
					</div>

					<div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
					<div class="span2 info-heading">Internet</div>
					<div class="span10">Wi-Fi is available in the hotel rooms and costs EUR 5 per 24 hours.</div>
					</div>

					<div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
					<div class="span2 info-heading">Parking</div>
					<div class="span10">No parking available.</div>
					</div>
				

Then the next category is added, with <h3> tags at the start and the same format for the amenities used as above before ending with an additional closing </div> tag to close out the section and end the page content:


				    <h3>Policies</h3>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Checkin</div>
				    <div class="span10">3:00 am - 9.00 pm</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Checkout</div>
				    <div class="span10">7.00 am - 9.00 pm</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Cancellation / Prepayment</div>
				    <div class="span10">Cancellation and prepayment policies vary according to apartment type. Please check the Apartment Conditions when selecting your apartment above. </div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Children and extra beds</div>
				    <div class="span10">Free! One child under 4 years stays free of charge when using existing beds. One child under 3 years is charged EUR 20 per night in a crib. One older child or adult is charged EUR 20 per night in an extra bed. The maximum number of extra beds/cribs in a room is 1. Any type of extra bed or crib is upon request and needs to be confirmed by management. Additional fees are not calculated automatically in the total cost and will have to be paid for separately during your stay.</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading">Pets</div>
				    <div class="span10">Pets are not allowed.</div>
				    </div>

				    <div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
				    <div class="span2 info-heading"> Accepted credit cards</div>
				    <div class="span10">American Express, Visa, Euro/Mastercard, Diners Club, Maestro. The hotel reserves the right to pre-authorise credit cards prior to arrival.. </div>
				    </div>

				    </div>
				
Adding the Main Image

The main image appears at the top of the room page; this is taken from the Featured Image of the page rather than from the HTML content. To add an image, open the Edit Page screen and click on the Set Featured Image text in the right-sidebar; you will be taken to your media library where you can upload a new image or select an existing one from your library. Click on the image you wish to use, then click the Set Featured Image button in the bottom-right to add the image to your room page.

Adding a Gallery

The gallery that appears under the main image of the page is created using the built-in WordPress gallery functionality. In the content you will see that the gallery is inserted via a shortcode:


					[gallery]
				

With various attributes added to define which images are displayed, the number of columns and more:


					[gallery columns="8" link="file" ids="102,99,96,94,105"]
				

Creating and inserting this shortcode is extremely easy; instead of manually adding the shortcode to the content, we can instead use the Add Media function to prepare the shortcode. On the Edit Page screen, click in the body content where you want to add the gallery; if you're following the layout as used in the demo content this should be right at the top of the content. Then click the Add Media button to open the Insert Media screen. Here, you will usually click on an image you wish to insert, but this time instead click on the Create Gallery text in the right-sidebar:

creating a gallery in the wordpress add media page

You will still see the available images from your media library, with just a change of text at the top. The functionality has changed though; now you can click on multiple images one after the other to create your gallery. Click once on every image you wish to add, then click the Create a New Gallery button in the bottom right. You will be taken to the Edit Gallery page, where you can drag and drop the images in your new gallery to set the order. There are also a set of options in the right-sidebar under Gallery Settings that allows you to set some of the main options:

  • Link To - This option defines where the images in the gallery should link to when clicked; this option should be set to Media File as the functionality included with Villa Belucci will display the image in a lightbox when clicked.
  • Columns - Sets the number of columns in the gallery, and thus the number of visible images. This number should be set to match the total number of images.
  • Random Order - Randomizes the order of images, ignoring any order previously set.
  • Size - Sets the size of the images. Since Villa Belucci includes a lightbox functionality for viewing enlarged images it's best to leave this as Thumbnail, otherwise the images will take up too much space. Users can click any image they want to see full-size.

Once all your options have been set, click on the Insert Gallery button in the bottom-right and the shortcode will be inserted into your page content.

Changing the Intro Text

The intro text is contained in the first set of <p> tags after the gallery shortcode, with a room-intro-text class attached:


					<p class="room-intro-text">Curabitur pulvinar nibh orci, gravida laoreet lectus vulputate volutpat. Fusce neque est, commodo et odio a, sollicitudin sollicitudin est. Maecenas in pretium tellus. Integer pharetra ex vitae odio sodales fermentum. Vestibulum viverra odio neque, sit amet fermentum enim maximus nec. Sed porta volutpat orci ac ullamcorper. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget urna at libero finibus pretium. Donec faucibus volutpat nisl ac placerat. Vestibulum odio turpis, volutpat at aliquet sit amet, volutpat eu lectus.</p>
				

Simply replace this text with your own:


					<p class="room-intro-text">Intro Text Here</p>
				
Changing the Tariff Box Text

The tariff box is made up of multiple elements since there are several types of text used. The entire section is contained within the <div> element with the tariff-box class, and consists of an offer name (large text on the left) contained in a set of <strong> tags, a subtitle to this large text which is in a set of <p> tags, and a price on the right created with three <span> elements; the text above the price uses a starting_from class, the price itself uses a min_tariff class, and the text under the price uses a tariff_suffix class:


					<div class="tariff-box">
					<div class="span5">
					<strong>Summer Holiday</strong><p>Enjoy your summer holiday at our hotel!</p></div>
					<div class="room-price align-right ">
					<span class="starting_from">Starting from</span><span class="min_tariff">EUR99.00</span><span class="tariff_suffix">/ room / 1 night</span>                     
					</div>
					</div>
				

Replace each of these elements with your own text, as shown below:


					<div class="tariff-box">
					<div class="span5">
					<strong>Offer Name</strong><p>Offer Text</p></div>
					<div class="room-price align-right ">
					<span class="starting_from">Text Above Price</span><span class="min_tariff">Price</span><span class="tariff_suffix">Text Under Price</span>     
					</div>
					</div>
				
Changing/Adding Information Lists

The information lists use styled text to display important information that guests may want to know about your hotel, including things such as opening times, car parking charges, hotel policies and more. Though they cover a variety of information, they all use the same basic HTML layout. In the demo layout the information list section is wrapped in a <div> with an info class attached; find this in the demo content, and you'll know where the policy content is:


					<div class="info"> 
				

Inside this <div> you can add as few or as many information lists as desired; simply add an <h3> tag for the section title:


					<h3>Section Title (e.g. Policies, Amenities, General Information)</h3>
				

And then add each item underneath; because of the different placement and width for the item titles and text this section will use a combination of <div> elements with special classes, but the basic layout is always the same; a <div> with row-fluid and custom-field-row classes that wraps the title and text, a <div> with span2 and info-heading classes for the title text, and a <div> with a span10 class for the text:


					<div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
					<div class="span2 info-heading">First Item Title</div>
					<div class="span10">First Item Content</div>
					</div>
				

You can add more items under each heading as you see fit; just continue adding them using the same HTML layout:


					<div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
					<div class="span2 info-heading">Second Item Title</div>
					<div class="span10">Second Item Content</div>
					</div>

					<div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
					<div class="span2 info-heading">Third Item Title</div>
					<div class="span10">Third Item Content</div>
					</div>

					<div class="row-fluid custom-field-row">
					<div class="span2 info-heading">Fourth Item Title</div>
					<div class="span10">Fourth Item Content</div>
					</div>
				

The GK Hotel Reservation Plugin

The Hotel Reservation plugin creates an easy-to-use contact form specifically designed for users to request accommodation dates, including specific fields for number of rooms, adults, children and stay dates.

the reservation plugin included with the hotel wordpress theme

This form is created by inserting a shortcode into the page content wherever you want the form to appear; you'll see it used in the frontpage header as well as the individual room pages created with the Rooms plugin.

How it Works

As with other shortcodes, there are several attributes you may use to modify the available fields and settings, but the basic contact form is created using the plain shortcode:


				[GK_Hotel_Reservation]
			

Inserting this basic shortcode into any of your content will create a contact form that uses the default attribute settings; these default settings are the same as those used in the demo layout.

To modify the default settings we'll need to add attributes within the square brackets after the shortcode title using the following syntax:


				[GK_Hotel_Reservation Attribute_1="X" Attribute_2="X"]
			

Where "Attribute_1/2" is the name of the option you wish to change, and "X" is the value you want to change it to. The available attributes for this shortcode are:

  • title - Sets the displayed title of the contact form; default is "Book Now".
  • subtitle - Sets the subtitle that appears under the title of the contact form; the default is "When would you like to stay villa?".
  • rooms_max - Sets the maximum number of rooms that may be requested via the Rooms drop-down list. The default is five.
  • adult_max - Sets the maximum number of adults that may be selected per room; default is two.
  • children_max - Sets the maximum number of children that may be selected per room; default is two.
  • fields - Sets the fields that are displayed and must be filled out by the user when making a request. There are three fields to enable/disable; "name", "email" and "phone". Enter the fields you want to use separated by a comma as a delimiter i.e. to use name and email, attribute would be fields="name,email". Default uses all fields.

Advanced Typography

To provide options for enhancing your text content, Villa Belluci includes a multitude of advanced typography options that add flair, from highlights to warnings, floated blocks and more.

How It Works

The typography options in Villa Belluci may be applied in the Text mode of the TinyMCE editor, where you enter raw HTML code alongside basic text. Here, you can manually add the classes required to achieve each effect to the relevant HTML tags. To use the Text mode, click on the Text tab at the top-right of the editor window:

running the wordpress post editor in text mode

When writing in HTML code in the text editor, you will need to manually attach the classes to the HTML tag, so that the correct CSS rules are applied.

To attach a class to an HTML tag, a new attribute, "class", followed by an equals sign and the class name in quotes, must be added to the opening tag of the element after the tag but before the closing bracket. This assigns a class to that element. For example, to add a class called "special" to an HTML <p> tag, you would write:


				<p class="special">Your Text</p>
			

The following sections will provide information on the classes available, and their functions.

Warnings

Warnings are highlighted text segments that are meant to draw attention to important information, such as rules, advice or guidelines. There are three types of warning available, each with a different purpose. To use them, simply add the class name to a <p> element:


				<p class="classname">
			

warning typography options in the wordpress hotel theme

  • gk-info - This attribute adds a grey line above the text and prefaces it with a speech-bubble icon to highlight information.
  • gk-success - This attribute adds a black line above the text and prefaces it with a lightbulb icon. It is useful for adding advice or hints to your content.
  • gk-notice - This attribute adds an orange line above the text and prefaces it with an orange warning sign; it is used for warnings.
  • gk-error - This attribute adds a red background and prefaces the text with a cross icon. It is used for negative statements.

Highlights

Highlights are a way to make a particular part of a paragraph stand out. Unlike the warnings, highlights can be applied in the middle of a paragraph without damaging the text layout.

highlights typography options in the villa belluci theme

To use highlights, you will need to add a set of <span> tags in your <p> tags to separate the phrase, and add the highlight class to the <span> element. For example, if you wish to add a highlight to the word "highlight" in the following <p> tag:


				<p>This is a highlight phrase</p>
			

You would need to add the opening <span> tag with the highlight class before the word "highlight", and the closing </span> tag after, like this:


				<p>This is a <span class="className">highlight</span> phrase</p>
			

In Villa Belluci there is one included highlight class, "gk-highlight", which will add a yellow background to the text.

Progress Bars

Progress bars display a progress bar that animates to a particular point defined by the user, with a label for the bar and a percentage point that appears at the termination point of the progress bar showing how far the bar is filled:

progress bars in the hotel theme typography

Progress bars are created using three elements. First is a <div> containing the bar and gk-loaded classes, as well as a style attribute containing a width property; this property accepts a percentage value which defines how far the bar should fill. After the opening <div> is a plain <p> tag, and inside this is a <span> tag; text is added between this tag to create the progress bar's label. Then, all elements are closed. For example, to create a progress bar with the label "Per cent complete" that fills to 90%, we'd use the following code:


				<div class="bar gk-loaded" style="width: 90%;">
				<p>
				<span>Label</span>
				</p>
				</div>
			

To add your own content, simply replace the text between the <span> tags to define the label, and change the percentage amount in the width property to whichever percentage you wish to use.

Code Listings

Code listings create blocks that separate code content away from the main content of your site, making it easy for users to spot and read your code:

code listings in the hotel wordpress theme

Creating the code block is easy; simply surround the text/code you want to separate with a set of <pre> tags:


				<pre>
				#wrapper {
				float: left;
				display: block;
				}
				</pre>
			

Unordered Lists

Unordered lists are just that; lists with no particular ordering i.e. no numbered or otherwise ordered entries. This is a good way to list points or minutes in an easily-readable format.

The classes for styling the unordered lists should be added in the opening <ul> tag that begins with list, with the <li> list item tags left as they are:


				<ul class="className">
				<li>Item 1</li>
				<li>Item 2</li>
				<li>Item 3</li>
				</ul>
			

There are four available unordered list classes, as follows:

unordered list typography options in the hotel theme

  • gk-bullet1 - This class uses solid black dots as the delimiter between each point.
  • gk-bullet2 - This class uses black blocks with a white checkmark inside as the delimiter to each point.
  • gk-bullet3 - This classes uses black star outlines as the delimiter to each point.
  • gk-bullet4 - This class uses black circles with a white arrow inside as the delimiter to each point.

Number Blocks

Number blocks create circles with character inside, such as a number, followed by a text. They are useful for highlighting larger points or available options.

The complexity of the number blocks means that they require some more complex HTML tags. Each block contains a <p> tag, which also has the class assigned to it, and a <span> tag that contains the character to appear in the block, with the text following this before the closing </p> tag. The basic structure looks like this:


				<p class="className">
				<span>Character (i.e. "1", "A")</span>
				Item Text
				</p>
			

The classes available are:

number block typography in the villa belluci wordpress theme

  • numblocks num-1 - This creates a orange colored circle and character inside, with black text.

Blocks

Blocks are ways to frame text to draw attention to it, either by adding colored backgrounds or outlines.

text block options in the hotel theme for wordpress

Creating blocks for your text is very easy; a basic <p> tag with a class added is all that's required:


				<p class="className">
			

The available classes for blocks are:

  • block-1 - This class adds a greyish-green background to the text.
  • block-2 - Similar to the above class, but this time using a yellow background.
  • legend - Creates a black outline around the text with a Legend label at the top-left of the block.

Blockquotes

Blockquotes allow you to elegantly highlight quotations in your article, to show that they are not from your pen, as it were.

The blockquotes format consists of a plain <blockquote> tag that contains the quoted text, which is then displayed offset from the rest of the content preceded a large quotation mark:


				<blockquote>Your Quote Here</blockquote>
			

There is one blockquote style included with Villa Belluci:

blockquotes in the hotel theme typography options

  • No Class - The basic blockquote layout; creates a block of text for the quote preceded by large quotation marks.

Floated Blocks

Floated blocks are some of the most visually-appealing typography options available in Villa Belluci. They allow you to highlight particular phrases or quotes from the text by adding them in colored text on the left, right, or centre of your main content, much like a newspaper.

The layout of the HTML tags for floated blocks depends on the type of floated block you are using, and where you want the block to appear. The text to appear in the floating block is defined in a <span> tag within your content. Content added before the <span> tag will appear above it, and content added after will be added alongside it. A standard piece of HTML using these blocks may look something like this:


				<p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vestibulum condimentum pulvinar justo, sed faucibus ligula feugiat ac. Morbi quis enim nulla, vel congue augue. Duis quis quam sed purus porta eleifend.

				<span class="gk-block-text-left">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.</span>

				Donec eget dignissim augue. Donec ante felis, aliquam ut consequat eget, lobortis dapibus risus. Aliquam laoreet enim et lectus ornare hendrerit. Aliquam rhoncus enim libero. Morbi aliquam, nibh mattis feugiat dapibus, nisi massa adipiscing justo, sit amet condimentum urna ipsum et lacus. Nam fermentum, eros quis ullamcorper convallis, libero mauris lacinia eros, sed tempus leo lorem vitae purus.</p>
			

with the following result:

floated blocks in the villa belluci typography options

Something to note here is that there is no set position for the <span> tag to be added; it should be placed organically at the end of a paragraph or line in the text to highlight a particular phrase. Use the preview option in WordPress as you write the content to see how it looks and make your decision from there, and experiment with the <span> tag placement; you will get the feel for your preference very quickly!

There are a total of three classes for floated blocks:

  • gk-block-text-left - This class aligns the text in the <span> tag to the left, with text following the tag appearing to the right.
  • gk-block-text-right - The same as the above class, except this time the <span> tag text is on the right, and the main content after the closing tag floating left.
  • gk-block-text-center - This tag creates a centrally-placed text block. Text before the <span> tag will appear above it, and text after the tag will appear below it.

Widget Settings

Villa Belluci, like all our modern themes, includes the GK Widget Rules plugin from GavickPro, which allows you to control exactly where a given widget will appear. Usually, you are limited to defining only the location where a widget appears, but with Widget Rules, you can set different widgets to appear on different pages, or limit particular widgets to a category etc...

It's a great way to diversify and target your widgets depending on the content.

Using Widget Rules

Once the plugin is activated, a Widget Rules button will appear at the bottom of every widget instance in the Widgets page, reachable by navigating to Appearance>Widgets in your WordPress dashboard. Clicking this button will expand the options accordingly, and you can start configuring where a widget appears.

The options available are:

  • Visible At - This option is used to micro-manage a widgets appearance by exception or the rule. For example, you can use No Pages Except to p
  • revent a widget from being displayed anywhere except areas you explicitly tell it to appear; great if you want the widget to appear on one or two static pages only. In contrast, the All Pages Except option applies the widget to the same place in all areas except the ones you tell it to avoid. Finally, All Pages simply displays the widget everywhere; this is the default behaviour.
  • Select Page to Add - After selecting whether you wish to automatically include or exclude pages, you need to add the content that should be ignored/included. With this option, you can select any particular page or post, all posts in a category, plus some additional pages such as 404 pages and the like.

    When necessary, an additional box will appear to allow you to enter category or post slugs; we will cover this process in the next section.

  • Selected Pages - This section shows any pages that have already been included/excluded.
  • Custom CSS Class - This option allows you to add a special CSS class to the widget; great if you want to target it for additional CSS styling.
  • Visible On - This option lets you decide which devices should see the widget in question. For example, you can set a widget to appear only on desktop browsers, or only on mobiles. This allows you to have a different instance of a widget depending on the device to ensure they get the best experience if a given widget isn't responsive.
  • Visible For - This option allows you to hide a widget from particular users; useful if you only want registered users to access the resource, for example.

Adding a Page/Post to the Selected Pages List

This short guide will show you how to add a specific page or post to the selected pages list, so they can be included or excluded from displaying a widget depending on your Visible At settings.

  1. Set your preferred option in the Visible At section, depending on whether you want to exclude pages from displaying the widget (All Pages Except) or include them (No Pages Except).
  2. In the Select Page to Add drop-down list, select Page or Post, depending on which one you wish to add.
  3. A new field will appear called Page ID/Title/slug. Enter the slug for the post or page you wish to include/exclude in this field, then click Add Page to add the page to the Selected Pages list.
  4. Click Save to save changes.

You may also set a widget to appear on all pages or all posts; after selecting Page or Post in the Select Page to Add drop-down list, instead of entering a slug in the provided field, just click Add Page, and this will add all pages or posts to the include/exclude list.

To get the post slug for a particular post, navigate to the Post List in your WordPress backend by clicking Posts>All Posts in the dashboard, then highlight the post you wish to display to bring up the options related to that post and click on Quick Edit. This will open a new set of options, including a field that contains the current post's slug, and also allows you to change it if necessary.

The same steps may be used to find the page slug; simply open the Page List from your dashboard by clicking Pages>All Pages in the left menu of your dashboard, then highlight the page you wish to add and click Quick Edit to see the page slug; copy this into the appropriate field in the Widget Rules settings.

Font Awesome

Font Awesome is an incredibly useful font for delivering scalable icons to your site. With over 500 icons available covering a wide range of topics, from popular social media icons to transportation and payment icons, there's something for every type of site available.

How It Works

Font Awesome functionality is included as standard with our themes, so you can start using their icons immediately. Icons are added to content using an icon <i> tag with a particular class attached that corresponds to the icon you want to display.

Every icon in the Font Awesome set has a class name beginning with fa, such as fa-pinterest for the Pinterest icon. To use an icon, this class name must be inserted into the <i> tag using the following format:


				<i class="fa fa-ClassName"></i>
			

Notice that fa appears twice in the class attribute; the first time to declare the use of Font Awesome, and the second time as part of the icon's class name. For example, to insert the Pinterest icon mentioned above, the code would be:


				<i class="fa fa-pinterest"></i>
			

A full list of available icons and their respective class names may be found at the bottom of the Villa Belluci demo Typography Page.

The tags should always be left blank, with no text between the opening and closing tags. You may insert these tags anywhere you are entering standard HTML content, including any of our frontpage sections, or in your pages and posts.

The WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) Editor that WordPress defaults to when editing posts and pages will usually clean up blank tags; that is, tags with no content between them. This will include <i> tags that create Font Awesome icons, since they do not have any text between the opening and closing tags. To counter this issue, make sure to only use the plain text editor when adding icons.

Reveal Animations

The reveal animations used in our themes are provided by the powerful ScrollReveal JavaScript Library. This library allows animations to be added to nearly every HTML element in your code via the use of a data-sr attribute; you may have noticed when modifying the code for the frontpage elements or additional pages that they often had this data-sr attribute attached to control the animation.

When this attribute is added to an HTML tag, that element will be animated into place using a default reveal animation:


			<h2 data-sr>My Title</h2>
		

However, ScrollReveal also includes multiple keywords that you can use to define the reveal animation using simple, understandable language. For example, the keyword "over Xs", where "X" is a time in seconds, will control the speed of the animation so that it take the value of "x" to complete. So, a value of:


			<h2 data-sr="over 2s">My Title</h2>
		

Will cause the default animation to take two seconds to complete. Similarly, there are many keywords for controlling the type of animation. using the enter keyword will let you define the direction from which the animation will start (top, left, right, and bottom), while move can define the distance (in pixels) the animated element should move. Combine them together with the over keyword, and you will have something like this:


			<h2 data-sr="Enter left move 24px over 2s">My Title</h2>
		

So with this setting, the title will appear 24px to the left of its final position, and will move right 24px to the final position over two seconds.

There are many more keywords that let you delay the animation, flip, spin, rotate and scale the element, and control attributes like starting opacity. A full list of the available keywords and their respective functions may be found on the ScrollReveal GitHub page.

The Contact Page

The Villa Belluci Contact page displays a controllable Google map with your location highlighted, a simple contact form and useful contact details such as phone and fax numbers as well as the street address.

the contact page in villa belluci

Creating a Contact Page

The demo content for Villa Belluci includes an example contact page ready to be modified, but if you're looking to create a new one from scratch it's a fairly standard process. As with the other pages, click on Pages → Add New in your admin area to add a new page. On the edit screen, add the page title to help you identify the page (the title won't be displayed on the live site) to the Title field.

Now copy the following HTML content into the mainbody of the page; this will get your contact page extra information matching our demo layout, ready for you to customize: :


			    <h3>Contact</h3>
			    <div class="contact-address"><span class="jicons-text">Address:</span><address><span class="contact-street">844 Linden Street Norwood MA 02062 123-5678 USA
			    </span></address></div>
			    <div class="contact-contactinfo">
			    <div><span class="jicons-text"> Phone: </span> <span class="contact-telephone"> (123) 456-7898 </span></div>
			    <div><span class="jicons-text"> Fax: </span> <span class="contact-fax"> (123) 456-7898 </span></div>
			    <div><span class="jicons-text"> Mobile: </span> <span class="contact-telephone"> (123) 456-7898 </span></div>
			    </div>  
			

Now have a look at the Page Attributes section in the right sidebar; find the option called Template, click on the drop-down list for this option and select the Contact Page template; this will ensure the right formatting and CSS rules are applied to the page, and will also allow you to change several contact-page related options when viewing the page in the Theme Customizer. Finally, click on Publish at the top of the right sidebar to publish the page and your contact form is ready.

Changing the Map Location and Target

The map section of the contact page is setup via the Theme Customizer, with specific options dedicated to the contact page. More details may be found in the Theme Options section of this guide.

Changing the Contact Mainbody Content

The mainbody content is created via simple HTML code added to the page mainbody field. The basic code looks like this:


			    <h3>Contact</h3>
			    <div class="contact-address"><span class="jicons-text">Address:</span><address><span class="contact-street">844 Linden Street Norwood MA 02062 123-5678 USA
			    </span></address></div>
			    <div class="contact-contactinfo">
			    <div><span class="jicons-text"> Phone: </span> <span class="contact-telephone"> (123) 456-7898 </span></div>
			    <div><span class="jicons-text"> Fax: </span> <span class="contact-fax"> (123) 456-7898 </span></div>
			    <div><span class="jicons-text"> Mobile: </span> <span class="contact-telephone"> (123) 456-7898 </span></div>
			    </div>
			

This section's HTML is fairly straightforward, but it may seem more complex because of the use of <div> and <span> elements to frame the content. If we split the content up things become a lot clearer; first, the title for the right column of the contact page is added via an <h3> tag:


			    <h3>Contact</h3>
			

Then, the address is added. The address is contained in its own <div> with the contact-address class, with the title "Address:" text wrapped in <span> tags and the address text itself wrapped in <address> and <span> tags:


			    <div class="contact-address">
			    <span class="jicons-text">Address:</span>
			    <address><span class="contact-street">
			    844 Linden Street Norwood MA 02062 123-5678 USA
			    </span></address></div>
			

For the three contact numbers for fax, phone and mobile, a standardized layout is used. An opening <div> with a contact-contactinfo class is used that wraps all these elements. Next, each number is added, with a <div> tag, a <span> tag with a jicons-text class, and then another <span> tag with either a contact-telephone or contact-fax class, depending on what kind of number is displayed in the section:


			    <div class="contact-contactinfo">

			    <div><span class="jicons-text"> Phone: </span> <span class="contact-telephone"> (123) 456-7898 </span></div>

			    <div><span class="jicons-text"> Fax: </span> <span class="contact-fax"> (123) 456-7898 </span></div>

			    <div><span class="jicons-text"> Mobile: </span> <span class="contact-telephone"> (123) 456-7898 </span></div>

			    </div>
			

Changing each of these elements is easy; you may simply replace the existing text between each tag with your own. You may also add or remove more phone/fax numbers by copying/deleting the tag layout above.

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